Manalive by G. K. Chesterton, Fiction, Literary eBook

Manalive by G. K. Chesterton, Fiction, Literary ❮Read❯ ➯ Manalive by G. K. Chesterton, Fiction, Literary Author G.K. Chesterton – Buyprobolan50.co.uk A wind sprang high in the west like a wave of unreasonable happiness and tore eastward across England trailing with it the frosty scent of forests and the cold intoxication of the sea It a million hol A wind sprang G. K. Epub Ú high in the west like a wave of unreasonable happiness and tore eastward across England trailing with it the frosty scent of forests and the cold intoxication of the sea It a million holes and corners it refreshed a man like a flagon and astonished him like a blow In the inmost chambers of intricate and embowered houses it Manalive by MOBI :º woke like a domestic explosion littering the floor with some professor s papers till they seemed as precious as fugitive or blowing out the candle by which a boy read Treasure Island and wrapping him in roaring dark But everywhere it bore drama into undramatic lives and carried the trump of crisis across the world Many a harassed mother in a mean backyard by G. K. Kindle Ö had looked at a five dwarfish shirts on the by G. K. Chesterton, Fiction, PDF \ clothes line as at some small sick tragedy it was as if she had hanged her five children Chesterton was always concerned with the problems facing the modern man Of course he observes we are far from perfect and at some point we will do wrong But here Chesterton goes a bit further showing by G. K. Chesterton, Fiction, PDF \ us that many things we have been taught are wrong aren t innately wrong at all.


10 thoughts on “Manalive by G. K. Chesterton, Fiction, Literary

  1. Jessica Snell Jessica Snell says:

    The first time I picked up this book, I was working in a library I flipped it open and found this conversationBut the cold fact remains imprudent marriages do lead to long unhappiness and disappointment you ve got used to your drinks and things I shan t be pretty much longer Imprudent marriages roared Michael And pray where in earth or heaven are there any prudent marriages Might as well talk about prudent suicides Unhappy of course you ll be unhappy Who the devil are The first time I picked up this book, I was working in a library I flipped it open and found this conversationBut the cold fact remains imprudent marriages do lead to long unhappiness and disappointment you ve got used to your drinks and things I shan t be pretty much longer Imprudent marriages roared Michael And pray where in earth or heaven are there any prudent marriages Might as well talk about prudent suicides Unhappy of course you ll be unhappy Who the devil are you that you shouldn t be unhappy, like the mother that bore you Disappointed of course we ll be disappointed I, for one, don t expect till I die to be so good a man as I am at this minute a tower with all the trumpets shouting You see all this, said Rosamund, with a grand sincerety in her solid face, and do you really want to marry me My darling, what else is there to do reasoned the Irishman What other occupation is there for an active man on this earth, except to marry you I was drawn in, and convinced my soon to be husband to read the rest of the book aloud to me for a birthday present That was, oh, eight or nine years ago We finally got our own copy last year, and it s been sitting on my TBR shelf ever since but noI gobbled this up yesterday Reading Chesterton is always a wild ride, and you re never sure which way is up when you re done This novel s hero, Innocent Smith, might come the closest to being an incarnation of Chesterton s general philosophy of life of any of his characters maybe eventhan Fr Brown.The book starts in a London boarding house the day a wind kicks up, and with that wind comes a man named Innocent Brown, who first energizes everyone, then appears to do something criminally insane The criminality is investigated, and it turns out that rather than being mad, Innocent Brown is in fact the sanest man that ever lived He breaks into his own house because he wishes to learn how to covet his own goods He threatens suicide fancying men with death so that they can see that they really prefer life He pretends to meet his own wife for the first time over and over so that he can see her as he knows she ought to be seen And, as one character says, he did it all in order to feel the same interest in his own affairs that he always felt in other people s I like this passage, where Smith is arguing with a Russian man about Ibsen The Doll s House he cried vehemently why, that is just where Ibsen was so wrong Why, the whole aim of a house is to be a doll s house Don t you remember, when you were a child, how those little windows WERE windows, while all the big windows weren t A child has a doll s house, and shrieks when a front door opens inwards A banker has a real house, yet how numerous are the bankers who fail to emit the faintest shriek when their real front doors open inwardsI have found out how to make a big thing small I have found out how to turn a house into a doll s house Get a long way off it God lets us turn all things into toys by his great gift of distance This book is a romp, and the great giant Innocent Brown jumps and jolts and thunders all through it like a baby elephant The best part is reading the dialogue that occurs around him, as onlookers try to figure him out Michael, the man from the first dialogue I quoted, finally comes to the conclusion that Innocent has distinguished between custom and creed He has broken the conventions, but he has kept the commandments He says that it is this complete goodness that makes Innocent so happy.Michael s friend, Gould, then disagrees with him, saying gravely, I do not believe that being perfectly good in all respects would make a man merry, to which Michael replies, quietly, Well, will you tell me one thing Which of us has ever tried it Loved this book, and love it still


  2. Douglas Wilson Douglas Wilson says:

    I prefer Chesterton s non fiction to his fiction, but this was still fun His fiction tends to bescattered that it needs to be, but it was still worthwhile reading His pithy way of putting things is always present, and the plot conceit was great He just needed an editor who 1 understood him 2 had great moral authority 3 had strong editorial chops, and 4 who was a lot of fun himself Alas, Chestertonian editors are as rare as Chestertonian writers.


  3. Claire Claire says:

    This is quite possibly my favorite book The message, storyline, characters, and even simply the choices of descriptive phrasing and wording all champion Chesterton s favorite topic the complete enjoyment of the experiment of being This is probably not the best choice for an introduction to Chesterton the book isenjoyable if you already know Chesterton s opinions and worldview It felt like he wrote it not to prove anything or make a great earth shattering statement, but to celebrat This is quite possibly my favorite book The message, storyline, characters, and even simply the choices of descriptive phrasing and wording all champion Chesterton s favorite topic the complete enjoyment of the experiment of being This is probably not the best choice for an introduction to Chesterton the book isenjoyable if you already know Chesterton s opinions and worldview It felt like he wrote it not to prove anything or make a great earth shattering statement, but to celebrate joy and life a celebration which is better enjoyed by one who understands that Chesterton viewed joy and life as ways to praise God rather than simply ways to please yourself The characters are better understood if you understand the character of the author


  4. Amy Amy says:

    Re read in 2017The first time I read this book, it took me several weeks I struggled with the writing style and characters As this was my pick for my book club this month, I prepped for a long, heavy readOnly to fly through it in a little over an hour How different this book reads when you know where it is going and that it is worth getting there This book is so powerful I can t wait to lead a discussion on it 2013 ReviewFinished this one a while ago but haven t marked i Re read in 2017The first time I read this book, it took me several weeks I struggled with the writing style and characters As this was my pick for my book club this month, I prepped for a long, heavy readOnly to fly through it in a little over an hour How different this book reads when you know where it is going and that it is worth getting there This book is so powerful I can t wait to lead a discussion on it 2013 ReviewFinished this one a while ago but haven t marked it as read Incredibly good Totally recommend, a must read at least once in your life Challenges and yet readable and fun


  5. Becca Jane Becca Jane says:

    Chesterton is definitely my favorite author he has brought life to my Christian walk He has a fantastic understanding of the abundance of life that is present in creation, does a great job pointing out the falsity of modern nihilist thought, and is a genius as he uses paradox to illustrate many of his points Stick it out through the first few chapters, and you will be grateful you read this book.


  6. John John says:

    Absolutely brilliant MANALIVE manages to be touching, heartfelt, and incredibly life affirming without resorting not even for an instant to saccharinity or melodrama Of all Chesterton s works, this book perhaps best encapsulates his personal outlook on life, and the amount of wit required for writing a novel like this is mind boggling MANALIVE is utterly jam packed with the sort of delicious paradoxes and unconventionally conventional wisdom I ve come to expect from Chesterton, but this is Absolutely brilliant MANALIVE manages to be touching, heartfelt, and incredibly life affirming without resorting not even for an instant to saccharinity or melodrama Of all Chesterton s works, this book perhaps best encapsulates his personal outlook on life, and the amount of wit required for writing a novel like this is mind boggling MANALIVE is utterly jam packed with the sort of delicious paradoxes and unconventionally conventional wisdom I ve come to expect from Chesterton, but this is the first time that the brilliance of his writing has actually given me the chills The closest comparison I can make is that this book feels like a cross between Charles Dickens flawless characterizations and prose and Lewis Carroll inspired lunacy that is so reasonable sounding, you begin to think YOU are the one who s crazy It s a crying shame this book has been mostly forgotten Without a doubt, Innocent Smith is one of the most endearing characters I ve encountered in all of literature Further, I consider it one of Hollywood s biggest failures that a movie adaptation starring Robin Williams was never produced And gasp probably not even considered My only criticism is that, on one or two occassions, Chesterton employs such racially charged language as is anathema in our modern PC society Which isn t to say he was racist simply a product of his time


  7. Jeff Miller Jeff Miller says:

    Re read 2018 08 02As a Chesterton fan Manalive is one of my all time favorite novels of his and really one of my all time favorite novels This story Innocent Smith seems to me to often be the story of G.K Chesterton Chesterton was a man deeply thankful for all things and would go beyond stopping and smelling the roses, but stopping and noticing he had two legs This novel also reminds me of some aspects of his The Napoleon of Notting Hill in the court that occurs in the house His idea of nei Re read 2018 08 02As a Chesterton fan Manalive is one of my all time favorite novels of his and really one of my all time favorite novels This story Innocent Smith seems to me to often be the story of G.K Chesterton Chesterton was a man deeply thankful for all things and would go beyond stopping and smelling the roses, but stopping and noticing he had two legs This novel also reminds me of some aspects of his The Napoleon of Notting Hill in the court that occurs in the house His idea of neighborhoods becoming sovereign translates in to the same for homes.This is my second read of the novel and even though I was quite aware of how the plot would resolve itself, it was still great fun chocked full of Chesterton s wisdom and his view of life Innocent Smith is such an interesting character who shows that he is not the oddball and the one crazy, but ourselves as we settle down to life not seeing things afresh.I listened to the just released Audiobook version of Manalive as put out by Ignatius Press Chestertonian and actor Kevin O Brien is wonderful as usual as once again he acts as a whole cast of players and gives us a version of Manalive I think Chesterton would have liked.As with most of Chesterton s books they are available on Project Gutenberg


  8. Madeleine Myers Madeleine Myers says:

    Not G.K at his best.I m almost sorry not to give any work of Chesterton less than five stars, because I have loved Father Brown, been blown over by The Everlasting Man, and delighted in his essays, which I am still exploring That said, I patiently plodded my way through this book hoping for the usual GKC s brilliance to peek out from the verbiage, and had it not been Chesterton s work, I probably would not have had the patience to finish it I found the characters unappealing and tedious, and Not G.K at his best.I m almost sorry not to give any work of Chesterton less than five stars, because I have loved Father Brown, been blown over by The Everlasting Man, and delighted in his essays, which I am still exploring That said, I patiently plodded my way through this book hoping for the usual GKC s brilliance to peek out from the verbiage, and had it not been Chesterton s work, I probably would not have had the patience to finish it I found the characters unappealing and tedious, and the prose too turgid for what should have been a lighter read I will go back to the essays


  9. Corey Corey says:

    G.K Chesterton really outdoes himself in this book I must be sent down, Smith said, and the people must not be told the truth And why not asked the other Because I mean to follow your advice, answered the massive youth, I mean to keep the remaining shots for people in the shameful state you and I were in last night I wish we could even plead drunkenness I mean to keep those bullets for pessimists pills for pale people And in this way I want to walk the world like a wonderful surpri G.K Chesterton really outdoes himself in this book I must be sent down, Smith said, and the people must not be told the truth And why not asked the other Because I mean to follow your advice, answered the massive youth, I mean to keep the remaining shots for people in the shameful state you and I were in last night I wish we could even plead drunkenness I mean to keep those bullets for pessimists pills for pale people And in this way I want to walk the world like a wonderful surprise to float as idly as the thistledown, and come as silent as the sunrise not to be expected anythan the thunderbolt, not to be recalled any than the dying breeze I don t want people to anticipate me as a well known practical joke I want both my gifts to come virgin and violent, the death and the life after death I am going to hold a pistol to the head of the Modern Man But I shall not use it to kill him only to bring him to life I begin to see a new meaning in being the skeleton at the feast ___ What I mean is that I caught a kind of glimpse of the meaning of death and all that the skull and cross bones, the Memento mori It isn t only meant to remind us of a future life, but to remind us of a present life too With out weak spirits we should grow old in eternity if we were not kept young by death Providence has to cut immortality into lengths for us, as nurses cut the bread and butter into fingers Then he added suddenly in a voice of unnatural actuality, But I know something now, Eames, I knew it when I saw the clouds turn pink What do you mean asked Eames What did you know I knew for the first time that murder is really wrong Nothing speaks quite as well as the book itself


  10. Rachel Heffington Rachel Heffington says:

    Another strange but funny and at moments poignant allegory I loved Innocent Smith and the havoc he wreaked simply by being an optimist in a pessimistic world D


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