Reading Scripture with the Reformers PDF/EPUB ò

Reading Scripture with the Reformers ❮Read❯ ➶ Reading Scripture with the Reformers ➺ Author Timothy George – Buyprobolan50.co.uk This book shows how the key figures of the Reformation read and interpreted Scripture, and how their thought was shaped by what they read We are invited to see what the church today can learn from the This book shows how the key figures with the PDF/EPUB ä of the Reformation read and interpreted Scripture, and how their thought was shaped by what they read We are invited to see what the church today can learn from the fathers of the Reformation, Reading Scripture MOBI :º and how these figures offer a model of reading, praying and living out the Scriptures.


10 thoughts on “Reading Scripture with the Reformers

  1. Aaron Meyer Aaron Meyer says:

    A nice introduction to the Reformation An introduction to the Reformation Commentary on Scripture series which are currently still having volumes published Though it was supposed to give reasons why we should read the Reformers words, I believe it never really did succeed in that It focused on individuals and events, not that I won t read the commentaries but it definitely didn t convince me why it would be necessary But nonetheless it boils down to many of these guys were mental giants and A nice introduction to the Reformation An introduction to the Reformation Commentary on Scripture series which are currently still having volumes published Though it was supposed to give reasons why we should read the Reformers words, I believe it never really did succeed in that It focused on individuals and events, not that I won t read the commentaries but it definitely didn t convince me why it would be necessary But nonetheless it boils down to many of these guys were mental giants and they deserve to be read and what better way than in a series of commentaries collecting together their own words


  2. Matt Pitts Matt Pitts says:

    Clear, helpful, and easy to read.


  3. Justin Lonas Justin Lonas says:

    In the American individualist mindset, it is easy for us to approach the Scriptures as a tabula rasa, thinking that an open Bible and an open heart is all we need to understand God fully While this idea flows from the Reformation principle of the priesthood of the believer, it is incomplete and can be dangerous because it downplays the impact of culture on our interpretation of biblical truths Even the reformers themselves knew that the Church, while not authoritative, was vital as a guide to In the American individualist mindset, it is easy for us to approach the Scriptures as a tabula rasa, thinking that an open Bible and an open heart is all we need to understand God fully While this idea flows from the Reformation principle of the priesthood of the believer, it is incomplete and can be dangerous because it downplays the impact of culture on our interpretation of biblical truths Even the reformers themselves knew that the Church, while not authoritative, was vital as a guide to keep individuals from reading Scripture in a vacuum and distorting its meaning This is the theme of Timothy George s engaging history, Reading Scripture with the Reformers Over eight chapters, he explores the Reformation as a revolution of a book , examining how the rediscovery of ancient writings and biblical scholarship spurred the translation of the Bible into the vernacular languages and brought much of the populace back to the fountain of revelation George devotes the first chapter of the book to a concise overview of the influence of biblical criticism and modernism and the resulting need for a historical and cultural perspective in studying Scripture Chapter two follows with a summary of the development of printing and the revival of ancient literary scholarship that helped make the Reformation as a mass cultural event possible Chapter 4 examines the tension between Scripture and tradition that marked the 16th Century and shows how the reformers stated their case of Scripture as the ultimate authority.Over the rest of the book, he discusses the contributions and influence of Erasmus chapter 3 , Luther chapters 5 and 6 , Zwingli and the Swiss Reformers chapter 7 , and Calvin chapter 8 Each section here looks at both the scholarly and active roles each individual played, and shows how their style influenced their followers and the Church as a whole.George brings a theologian s eye for grand detail to his study, and the result is thoroughly academic and yet immensely readable He weaves the stories of the reformers and the story of the Scripture itself as it was copied and disseminated over the centuries into a steady narrative that keeps readers turning the pages History can be quite intriguing, and George makes the most of his opportunity to inspire others to learn about themselves by looking into the past


  4. Matt Moran Matt Moran says:

    Wonderful book.This is a small Reformation history with biographical sketches of some of the main players Luther, Calvin, Zwingli Specifically, it focuses on the Scripture itself as the force behind the Reformation.The opening chapter on the Reformers relationship with the Bible and the closing chapter on the Reformed emphasis on preaching are particularly good From the reformers we learn that the true purpose of biblical scholarship is not to show how relevant the Bible is to the modern wor Wonderful book.This is a small Reformation history with biographical sketches of some of the main players Luther, Calvin, Zwingli Specifically, it focuses on the Scripture itself as the force behind the Reformation.The opening chapter on the Reformers relationship with the Bible and the closing chapter on the Reformed emphasis on preaching are particularly good From the reformers we learn that the true purpose of biblical scholarship is not to show how relevant the Bible is to the modern world, but rather how irrelevant the modern and postmodern world and we as person enmeshed in it have become in our self centered preoccupations and sinful rebellion against the God who spoke and still speaks by His Spirit through His chosen prophets and apostles


  5. John John says:

    Such a wonderful book A fascinating look at the Reformers and their Bible This is monumental task that George has accomplished Full of historical insights from the emergence of the printing press, the affect of Erasmus and the rise of the humanities, how the early church fathers and tradition influenced the reformers, and fire blazing life of Luther Full of juicy quotes and antidotes I highly recommend the book, even if it s an era and topic that you re familiar with George helps us put to Such a wonderful book A fascinating look at the Reformers and their Bible This is monumental task that George has accomplished Full of historical insights from the emergence of the printing press, the affect of Erasmus and the rise of the humanities, how the early church fathers and tradition influenced the reformers, and fire blazing life of Luther Full of juicy quotes and antidotes I highly recommend the book, even if it s an era and topic that you re familiar with George helps us put together pieces that haven t been put together, at least at this level


  6. Craig Hurst Craig Hurst says:

    If there is one thing that could be said to be true across many divides is a timeless desire for renewal to something foundational within a people, group or ideology Renewal to basic foundations and principles often times creates revival among the participants and results in the spread of the message This is true for Christianity Often times the thread of renewal that runs throughout Christian revival not just evangelistic revival is a return to sacred Scripture.This renewed focus on Script If there is one thing that could be said to be true across many divides is a timeless desire for renewal to something foundational within a people, group or ideology Renewal to basic foundations and principles often times creates revival among the participants and results in the spread of the message This is true for Christianity Often times the thread of renewal that runs throughout Christian revival not just evangelistic revival is a return to sacred Scripture.This renewed focus on Scripture is the subject of Timothy George s new book Reading Scripture with the Reformers In conjunction with IVP Timothy George has edited the Reformation Commentary on Scripture series which seeks provide the reader with a vast wealth of rich commentary on Scripture from the Reformation era Reading Scripture with the Reformers provides the historical context in which these commentary selections are taken from as the Reformers exposited Scripture anew for their time and the future life of the church.Spurring of RenewalLike with any revival, there are always ingredients to a renewed focus on Scripture of which the Reformation is no exception While the invention of the printing press and the return to the original languages of Scripture and the classics provided a fertile ground for Scriptural renewal, George highlights three areas of recurring tension that, in coming to head, became the tipping point for the Reformation First, there was the relationship between Scripture and tradition This is one of the most well know issues when discussing the Reformers contentions with the ruling Catholic Church of the time Second, there was the desire on the part of many reformation church leaders to make the Scriptures available in the language of the common person It was the desire of these men that even the most unlearned of people could read the Bible on their own Finally, there was the issue of how the Bible was used in the life and worship of the church For the Bible was meant to be not only read, studied, translated, memorized, and meditated on It was also to be embodied in preaching, baptism, the Lord s Supper, singing, praying, and service in the world p 14 Foundations of RenewalIf there is ever a discipline Evangelicals needs to be renewed in is the intentional habit of reading the works of those who have gone before us We need to, as George strongly suggests, reject the idea of the imperialism of the present p 23 The notion that what we learn and know in the present is superior to what was learned and known in the past That we have nothing to learn from the past and that historical and theological ignorance is bliss This mindset stems from a narrow view of sola scriptura For it is one thing to say Scripture is our only final authority but it is another thing to say it is the only authority the church has in regards to Scripture With this in mind, George lays out five principles that guide our reading and understanding of Scripture which were also guides for the Reformers 1 the Bible is the inspired and authoritative Word of God, 2 the Bible is rightly read in light of the rule of faith, 3 faithful interpretation of Scripture requires a trinitarian hermeneutic, 4 the Bible is front and center in the worship of the church and 5 the study of the Bible is a means of grace p 31 36 What the reader will see throughout the book is how these five guidelines for reading and interpreting Scripture worked themselves throughout the Reformation understanding of Scripture And further, that when we step back and observe the big picture of the church and biblical interpretation we will see that The reformers read, translated and interpreted the Bible as part of an extended centuries old conversation between the holy pages of God s Word and the company of God s people While in many cases they broke with the received interpretations of the fathers and the scholastics who came before them, theirs was nonetheless a churchly hermeneutic p 40 A History of RenewalWhat follows throughout the book is an in depth tour of the movers and movements that shaped the Reformation as the reformers sought to bring Scripture once again to the center of the churches attention amidst all other voices that became a clanging symbol of distraction and distortion to its truth Amidst all of the names and dates mentioned in the book and there are a lot one sees that there was a true spiritual renewal of the primacy of the voice of Scripture in the life, worship and interpretation of the church Though each chapter is dedicated to seeing the development of scriptural renewal in the Reformation, there are several common threads that emerge First, there is the two sided coin analogy when it comes to the people of the reformation One the one hand there were many laypeople some who were largely uneducated who had a notable impact on the reformation Many laypeople realized the need to educate Christians on Scripture and sought to help get the Bible and various support material in their language Also, men were not the only ones behind this lay led arm of the reformation Women like Argula von Grumbach were vocal supporters of Luther and others p 48 49 Second, on the other hand, the reformation might not have happened if it were not for the highly trained and educated men of the time Theological education was needed to challenge the tangled Catholic theology the reformation sought to refute Linguistic education was needed to exegete the Scriptures in the original languages and to translate them into the vernacular languages of the various uneducated Christians Third, there was the always present struggle between the role of Scripture and tradition This was one of the defining features that birthed the reformation The reformers were not looking to toss tradition but rather give Scripture its proper voice over tradition In chapter four, Whose Bible Which Tradition , George provides a helpful summary of the reformation understanding the two as expressed at the Diet of Speyer in 1529 p 118 24 Fourth, perhaps the most fascinating chapter of the whole book is seven, Along the Rhine, which locates the people, places and events of the reformation along the Rhine River It was amazing to see how geographical location played a role in certain events and how a river can be used to tell the history of one of the greatest movements in Christianity Finally, any discussion of the reformation would not be complete without mentioning Martin Luther Though there are two chapters dedicated to Luther, he his influence is mentioned and felt throughout the entire book It might not be a stretch to say that a history of the reformation and Luther are one in the same in many respects Luther s reformation influence is so deep that George begins chapter six, Lutheran Ways, by asking the question, Would the reformation have happened without Luther p 171 While George does not come out and say no, I feel that is the tacit answer and probably rightly so.ConclusionReading Scripture with the Reformers is a tour de force through the reformations renewal of scriptural primacy within the church The reader is brought to the two sided reality that the church owes much to the reformers for we stand on their shoulders And, that we need to continue to listen to the voice of the reformation as it echoes down the halls of church history The dangers within the church that it sought to correct are always lurking at her doors today It is the sinfulness of man that will always desire the tradition of man over the faith once delivered to the saints as revealed in Scripture This return to Scripture was not an end in itself as if to create a church characterized by bibliolatry Rather, as George concludes, the desired result of the reformation and the church today, is to point men and women both to the written Word in Scripture and to the living Word Jesus Christ p 258 NOTE I received this book from IVP for free in exchange for an honest review The words and ideas expressed in this review are my own


  7. T.C. Robinson T.C. Robinson says:

    An OverviewReading Scripture flows quite well The writing style is neither dry or dull but quite lively, something of a page turner, if you will.Reading Scripture is part of the story of how the Bible came to have a central role in the 16th century movement for religious reform that we now call the Protestant Reformation For example, by the time of Luther s death in 1546, it is estimated that half a million copies of the Bible were in circulation.Chapter 1 Why Read the Reformers This is some An OverviewReading Scripture flows quite well The writing style is neither dry or dull but quite lively, something of a page turner, if you will.Reading Scripture is part of the story of how the Bible came to have a central role in the 16th century movement for religious reform that we now call the Protestant Reformation For example, by the time of Luther s death in 1546, it is estimated that half a million copies of the Bible were in circulation.Chapter 1 Why Read the Reformers This is something of a treat for the newcomer on the place given to Scripture by the reformers And the oft quoted sola scriptura, which is largely misunderstood today, must be given its proper place as used by the reformers For example, the reformers read, translated and interpreted the Bible as part of an extended centuries old conversation between the holy page of God s Word and the company of God s people p 40.Chapter 2 Ad Fontes This chapter features several unsung heroes and their struggles to read Scripture and share it with common folks It also covers the first printing press, the rise of renaissance humanism, the trilingualism, that is, the study of Greek, Hebrew, and Latin, which the biblical humanists required to have complete and reliable texts of the Bible.Chapter 3 The Erasmian Moment Yes, Desiderius Erasmus who embodied the ideals of biblical humanism Reading Scripture with the church fathers, which was something of a stable among the reformers, was part of the ecumenical bequest of Erasmus to the church of the sixteenth century p 78 Erasmus gave the reformers The Greek New Testament It is said that Erasmus laid the egg that Luther hatched Chapter 4 Whose Bible Which Tradition It is in this chapter that the formal principle of sola scriptura is best understood, as it was appropriated by the reformers against Rome It is here we encounter Luther s 95 Theses and the Diet of Worms in 1521.Chapter 5 Doctor Martinius In this chapter, we meet Luther to exegete and the theologian and the methods he employed and the principal themes in his theology For Luther, receiving the doctor of theology meant Then I had to accept the office of doctor and swear a vow to my most beloved Holy Scriptures that I would preach and teach them faithfully and purely p 139.Chapter 6 Lutheran Ways Meet Master Philipp, often overshadowed by Luther, but who, according to Timothy George, was Neither a cipher for Luther nor an echo of Erasmus, he was a leading interpreter of Scripture and a creative formulator of the Reformation tradition p 75 Here Luther becomes the translator, which precipitated a flood of Bibles.Chapter 7 Along the Rhine The Reformation has already spread all over Germany and beyond Meet Cologne, Mainz, Strasbourg, and their Reformation and counter Reformation efforts Here we encounter William Tyndale, Bullinger, Bucer, Zell, Calvin, Hubmaier, and others.Chapter 8 Preach the Word It is here we discover the priority given to preaching by the reformers a priority it never had before It is also here we encounter Zwingli s Prophecy, which Professor George considers the greatest contribution of the Zurich reformers to the tradition of preaching Following the pattern established by Zwingli and Bullinger in Zurich, Calvin adopted the discipline of the lectio continua, preaching through books of the Bible expositorily.A CritiqueThe title Reading Scripture with the Reformers is a bit misleading At least, I think so Here s why When I think of reading Scripture with the reformers, I m thinking about how the reformers went about formulating their theology Perhaps I m wrong here.Also, though Calvin was mentioned a few times, especially in Strasbourg, I was expecting a biton Calvin But I supposed Luther s journey and contribution, especially as a translator, iscompelling In all fairness to Professor George, Reading Scripture with the Reformers is only part of the story.At any rate, as a Baptist, who belong to the wider Reformation tradition, I appreciate the journey Professor George takes his readers on, especially in his dealing with the many unsung heroes of the pre and 16th century Reformation Professor George s dealings with Erasmus is something of a historical treat, raising somewhat my appreciation of Erasmus, even though he straddled the fence, playing it safe, and never really casting his lot with the reformers.If you re looking for a solid, historical read on the fight for the Bible and its place during the 16th century Reformation, the contribution of the biblical humanists, and a better understanding of sola scriptura, then I recommend Reading Scripture with the Reformers


  8. Tim Tim says:

    Though of a manageable size, Reading Scripture with the Reformers contains innumerable helpful insights For example, the revered Reformers, unlike most modern evangelicals, valued the writings of early church Fathers and various medieval thinkers in seeking to understand Scripture better John Calvin, writing many years before the life of the mind became a popular concept, noted the value of Scripture to combat the idol producing tendencies of human thinking Readers also learn that Luther st Though of a manageable size, Reading Scripture with the Reformers contains innumerable helpful insights For example, the revered Reformers, unlike most modern evangelicals, valued the writings of early church Fathers and various medieval thinkers in seeking to understand Scripture better John Calvin, writing many years before the life of the mind became a popular concept, noted the value of Scripture to combat the idol producing tendencies of human thinking Readers also learn that Luther stressed the use of pictures for the instruction of children and the illiterate as invaluable in communicating Gospel truths We further discover that, though the self praising Erasmus deserves some accolades, the Dutch scholar failed to master Hebrew, publish Scripture in a common language, or adequately address the issue of man s sin In addition, we find how Zwingli aimed to bebiblical than Luther by pruning worship of ceremonies and other practices unsupported by Scripture.This text has further, unexpected insights as well We re introduced to Petrarch s concept of the historical imagination , which enabled the masses to enter into literature in a radical new way In addition, readers learn how Lorenzo Valla, in the fifteenth century, paved the way for others to seekaccurate translations of Greek texts Further, we find that the early reformers valued the role of Jesus mother Mary a good dealthan their kinsmen would today Also, readers discover how the earliest Baptists had a high level of appreciation for the historic Christian creeds Finally, we learn that modern hermeneutics owesto the Enlightenment than to the Reformation.In Reading Scripture with the Reformers, Dr George has produced an awesome text for anyone serious about their evangelical heritage In addition to those cited above, numerous other personalities and thoughts are brought forth throughout this work I simply cannot recommend it enough


  9. Nate Claiborne Nate Claiborne says:

    I found this book to very helpful for historical study While it wasn t quite what I expected when I requested it, George does such a good job weaving together historical narrative that I didn t mind For someone looking for an accessible introduction to the 16th century world that focuses on how that world shaped the transmission of the Bible into the common man s possession, this is it Likewise, if you want a good snapshot of Martin Luther s understanding of Scripture and how that affected hi I found this book to very helpful for historical study While it wasn t quite what I expected when I requested it, George does such a good job weaving together historical narrative that I didn t mind For someone looking for an accessible introduction to the 16th century world that focuses on how that world shaped the transmission of the Bible into the common man s possession, this is it Likewise, if you want a good snapshot of Martin Luther s understanding of Scripture and how that affected his role in the Reformation, this is the book for you It s certainly not exhaustive, but George uncovers many lesser known figures in his historical survey while still keeping the focus on the main events Throughout it all, the reader is able to see how the Reformers recovered approaches to reading Scripture that werein line with the early church and how we might be look back to them in order to understand both groups better.For a full review, see my blog


  10. Todd Miles Todd Miles says:

    This was an engaging book from cover to cover George chronicles the early stages of the reformation focusing on the role of Scripture and preaching Luther takes center stage, but there is also significant attention given to Bucer and Zwingli, among others My only complaint and this is relatively small is that I would have loveddetail on Calvin He concludes the book, but his role is relatively small, but tantalizing It left me wishing forGreat book, written in an enjoyably eas This was an engaging book from cover to cover George chronicles the early stages of the reformation focusing on the role of Scripture and preaching Luther takes center stage, but there is also significant attention given to Bucer and Zwingli, among others My only complaint and this is relatively small is that I would have loveddetail on Calvin He concludes the book, but his role is relatively small, but tantalizing It left me wishing forGreat book, written in an enjoyably easy to read fashion Great illustrations are provided George concludes the book by tracing the spread of the reformation across Germany and surrounding areas This was an effective literary device, but the editors should have included a map


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