The Translation Studies Reader eBook Ý The


    The Translation Studies Reader eBook Ý The studies beyond its traditional boundaries, in fields such as philosophy, sociology and film studies."/>
  • Paperback
  • 560 pages
  • The Translation Studies Reader
  • Lawrence Venuti
  • English
  • 28 June 2017
  • 041531920X

10 thoughts on “The Translation Studies Reader

  1. Max Nemtsov Max Nemtsov says:

    , 1900 1990 , , ,, , , 1900 1990 , , ,, , , , , ,, , ,, ,, , , , ,,,


  2. Anna Hiller Anna Hiller says:

    I m mad because this edition of the TSR took out Ortega y Gasset s important essay The Misery and Splendor of Translation Other than that, though, very thorough.


  3. Donal Lyons Donal Lyons says:

    It s one of the standard textbooks It d be better without Venuti though.


  4. Melvyn Melvyn says:

    The decade summaries are very much appreciated, because there is just so much material to digest here Ironically, I found a couple of the essays were quite poorly translated, which in combination with some pretty abstruse thinking can be torture to read I also find it annoying that an awful lot of translation theory can be quite remote from the nuts and bolts of translation work, so it would have been useful to readspecific examples of translated texts and the comparative issues involved The decade summaries are very much appreciated, because there is just so much material to digest here Ironically, I found a couple of the essays were quite poorly translated, which in combination with some pretty abstruse thinking can be torture to read I also find it annoying that an awful lot of translation theory can be quite remote from the nuts and bolts of translation work, so it would have been useful to readspecific examples of translated texts and the comparative issues involved as one normally does in Peter Newmark s excellent work But overall a worthwhile compilation that I will come back to again and again for reference Just a few random thought provoking but not necessarily very useful quotes It is the situation that has been translated, rather than the actual grammatical structure.Translation is not a duplicate of the original text it is not it shouldn t try to be the work itself with a different vocabulary I would say translation doesn t even belong to the same literary genre as the text that was translated It would be appropriate to reiterate this and affirm that translation is a literary genre apart, different from the rest, with its own norms and own ends The simple fact is that the translation is not the work, but a path toward the work.Ji Lev cites experiments to show that pragmatic translation involves a gradual semantic shifting as translators choose from a number of possible solutions Modern translators, he asserts, intuitively apply the minimax strategy, choosing the solution which promises a maximum of effect with a minimum of effort the eclectic Lev , who synthesizes psycholinguistics, semantics, structural anthropology, literary criticism, and game theory.Francis Storr 1909 goes so far as to classify translators into the literalist and the spiritualist schools, and in doing so takes his stand on the Biblical text, The letter killeth but the spirit giveth life As evidence for his thesis, Storr cites the difference between the Authorized Version, which he contends represents the spirit, and the English Revised Version, which sticks to the letter, with the result that the translation lacks a Sprachgef hl In most European literatures, there are several parallel translations of Shakespeare differing in their conception, and they are felt to be necessary With Moli re, the dispersion of interpretations is by far not so great sic Ortega y Gasset speaks of the sadness of the translator after failure There is also a sadness after success, the Augustinian tristitia which follows on the cognate acts of erotic and of intellectual possession.Unquestionably there is a dimension of loss, of breakage hence, as we have seen, the fear of translation, the taboos on revelatory export which hedge sacred texts, ritual nominations, and formulas in many cultures.The motion of transfer and paraphrase enlarges the stature of the original Historically, in terms of cultural context, of the public it can reach, the latter is leftprestigious.This view of translation as a hermeneutic of trust lancement , of penetration, of embodiment, and of restitution, will allow us to overcome the sterile triadic model which has dominated the history and theory of the subject.A given source text does not have one correct or best translation only VermeerEnglish tends to prefer fully formed, assertive clauses, whereas French is content with participial phrases or relatively elliptical expressions and on aspect English requires , andprecise, aspectual markers.Consonant with the tendencies Guillemin Flescher ascribes to English, the translator takes the liberty of adding conjunctions, concessives, and adversatives that tie sentences together muchtightly than does the French, which often leaves them crisply separated There are also instances where the translation adds substantial phrases so as to transform elliptical utterances into well formed sentences with subject and verbal complement.Exoticization may join up again with popularization by striving to render a foreign vernacular with a local one, using Parisian slang to translate the lunfardo of Buenos Aires, the Normandy dialect to translate the language of the Andes or Abruzzese Unfortunately, a vernacular clings tightly to its soil and completely resists any direct translating into another vernacular.Translation is the most intimate act of reading I surrender to the text when I translate


  5. Liam Guilar Liam Guilar says:

    Translation studies is a very recent academic speciality the act of translation and the activity of arguing about translation have been an ongoing human process This book is in some waysabout Translation Studies than translationwhich sounds odd.but it is a text book with guidelines on how to use it in class If you accept that it s about translation studies then the fact that the first section contains work from the 1900 1930s isn t really surprising But it does give the odd impre Translation studies is a very recent academic speciality the act of translation and the activity of arguing about translation have been an ongoing human process This book is in some waysabout Translation Studies than translationwhich sounds odd.but it is a text book with guidelines on how to use it in class If you accept that it s about translation studies then the fact that the first section contains work from the 1900 1930s isn t really surprising But it does give the odd impression that the twentieth century discovered translation, or suddenly woke up to the fact everyone was doing it That reservation aside, it s a good selection of essays in one place, which will provide anyone interested in translation with an introduction to what the editor thinks are the main issues


  6. Zenjulon Girtzel Zenjulon Girtzel says:

    DONT KNOW IF I READ THE WHOLE THING TRANSLATION THEORY IS TERRIBLY DULL


  7. Mohammad Aboomar Mohammad Aboomar says:

    This reader collects various journal articles and book chapters that contributed to shaping the discipline of Translation Studies throughout the years The topics are quite varied and the authors come from various backgrounds, which if anything is a testimony of how interdisciplinary the field is The articles and chapters presented in chronological order also betrays the many turns and paradigms the field witnessed rather than incrementally create knowledge, the scholars contributing to the li This reader collects various journal articles and book chapters that contributed to shaping the discipline of Translation Studies throughout the years The topics are quite varied and the authors come from various backgrounds, which if anything is a testimony of how interdisciplinary the field is The articles and chapters presented in chronological order also betrays the many turns and paradigms the field witnessed rather than incrementally create knowledge, the scholars contributing to the literature of Translation Studies reinvent and refocus the field every decade or two


  8. Alison Alison says:

    I like the essays in this book, especially the way they are organized in chronological order It gives a good picture of how translation theory has evolved over the years and centuries My main criticism is that I wish there was some sort of small introduction for each essay or even each time period that put the essays in context Especially because some of these essays are actually transcribed speeches, I just didn t understand the context and had to look up a lot about them in order to rea I like the essays in this book, especially the way they are organized in chronological order It gives a good picture of how translation theory has evolved over the years and centuries My main criticism is that I wish there was some sort of small introduction for each essay or even each time period that put the essays in context Especially because some of these essays are actually transcribed speeches, I just didn t understand the context and had to look up a lot about them in order to really understand the message For example, for the Derrida essay, it was muchuseful to me after I read the original translator s introduction that was originally published with it


  9. J J says:

    Solid, includes the classics, but some real nonsense is in here, too.


  10. Lucy Lucy says:

    Lawrence Venuti offers an insightful and interesting reader on the relatively new discipline of Translation Studies.Starting with Jerome s Letter to Pammachius and concluding with Venuti s Genealogies of Translation Theory, the 31 essays focus on the most important and influential developments in translation, how it has evolved, what translators aim at, how to get to the reader in the most effective manner, to just name a few.Translators contributing to this reader have their own view, which of Lawrence Venuti offers an insightful and interesting reader on the relatively new discipline of Translation Studies.Starting with Jerome s Letter to Pammachius and concluding with Venuti s Genealogies of Translation Theory, the 31 essays focus on the most important and influential developments in translation, how it has evolved, what translators aim at, how to get to the reader in the most effective manner, to just name a few.Translators contributing to this reader have their own view, which of course may be different to that of others, and at times even contradicting Fidelity, adequacy, acceptability, paraphrasis, literalism, foreignizing, domesticating are among the concepts that resonate the most in their essays, but in the end and in their own way, each essay shows that no matter what, translators always run towards the same goal and that is to have a faithful representation of a source text in a different target culture.Also the essays dealing with notions of gender, linguistics, post colonialism, feminism, solidarity between peoples, homosexuality, relevance, war and new technologies are a good starting point to delve deeper into these matters that are so contemporary to us One of my favorite translation books for sure Recommended to all translation students and translators


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The Translation Studies Reader❰Ebook❯ ➠ The Translation Studies Reader Author Lawrence Venuti – Buyprobolan50.co.uk The Translation Studies Reader provides a definitive survey of the most important and influential developments in translation theory and research, with an emphasis on twentieth century developments Wi The Translation Studies Reader provides a definitive survey of the most important and influential developments in translation theory and research, with an emphasis on twentieth century developments With introductory essays prefacing each The Translation Epub / section, the book places a wide range of seminal and innovative readings within their thematic, cultural and historical contextsThis second edition of this classic reader has been fully revised and updated Venuti has also extended the selection to include key pre twentieth century texts, adding a historical dimension Other new readings expand the range of theoretical discourses and practical applications covered, exploring the influence of translation studies beyond its traditional boundaries, in fields such as philosophy, sociology and film studies.


About the Author: Lawrence Venuti

Born in Philadelphia, Venuti graduated from Temple University He has long lived in New York City In he completed the PhD in English at Columbia University That year he received the The Translation Epub / Renato Poggioli Award for Italian Translation for his translation of Barbara Alberti s novel DeliriumVenuti is currently professor of English at Temple University He has also taught as a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, Columbia University, University of Trento, University of Mainz, Barnard College, and Queen s University BelfastHe is a member of the editorial or advisory boards of Reformation The Journal of the Tyndale Society, The Translator Studies in Intercultural Communication, TTR Traduction, Terminologie, Redaction, Translation Studies, Target An International Journal of Translation Studies, and Palimpsestes He has edited special journal issues devoted to translation and minority The Translator in and poetry and translation Translation Studies in His translation projects have won awards and grants from the PEN American Center , the Italian government , the National Endowment for the Arts , , and the National Endowment for the Humanities In he held a Fulbright Senior Lectureship in translation studies at the University of Vic SpainIn he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for his translation of Giovanni Pascoli s poetry and proseIn his translation of Ernest Farr s s Edward Hopper Poems won the Robert Fagles Translation Prize.