Hardcover î Robert Elsmere PDF/EPUB º



10 thoughts on “Robert Elsmere

  1. Caroline Caroline says:

    Fascinating portrayal of the high and low church issues in 19th century England, the way science was challenging belief, and the different ways that people of faith responded some by denial of science, some by attempts to move from a literal interpretation of the Bible to something still spiritual I was not aware of the role that German linguistics research early in the century and then geological research had already played in breaking the science vs literal Bible issue wide open before Darwi Fascinating portrayal of the high and low church issues in 19th century England, the way science was challenging belief, and the different ways that people of faith responded some by denial of science, some by attempts to move from a literal interpretation of the Bible to something still spiritual I was not aware of the role that German linguistics research early in the century and then geological research had already played in breaking the science vs literal Bible issue wide open before Darwin published his research don t worry there isn t any actual linguistics or geology discussion in the novel There is some rather tough sledding in romantic in the vs classical sense passages, and she assumes a lot of knowledge about the religious controversies That means a lot is unsatisfying and a bit mystifying because she says he thought, read and talked about it and you re supposed to know what that constituted I had to do some additional research to figure out what he was agonizing about But well worth reading to understand how serious this was to some sections of English society, and per my addl reading how many people fell away from any church connection during this time It makes an interesting contrast to Trollope s high vs low church portrayal in the Barchester Towers series, and it highlights how lacking Dickens is in almost any mention of church or clergymen at least in the five or six novels of his that I ve read recently


  2. Simon Simon says:

    One of the best books I ve ever read It has the best only literary depiction of myself I ve come across Not Elsmere but Edward Langham.The philosopher in the book, Gray, is based on T.H Green.


  3. Leonie Leonie says:

    1888 novel about a clergyman s doubts Robert is a boyishly likeable people person with an intellectual side The beginning section is about Robert trying to get married to Catherine, an ascetically beautiful oldest sister who s a little too rigidly good for anyone s peace of mind The battle Robert and Catherine s family have is to persuade Catherine she doesn t need to sacrifice herself to look after her family Catherine s younger sister Rose is musical and rebellious and really quite anxious 1888 novel about a clergyman s doubts Robert is a boyishly likeable people person with an intellectual side The beginning section is about Robert trying to get married to Catherine, an ascetically beautiful oldest sister who s a little too rigidly good for anyone s peace of mind The battle Robert and Catherine s family have is to persuade Catherine she doesn t need to sacrifice herself to look after her family Catherine s younger sister Rose is musical and rebellious and really quite anxious to get Catherine out the door Ward is quite good at presenting both sisters sympathetically Once Robert and Catherine are married the novel is muchsolidly focused on clerical stuff, with occasional breaks to follow Rose Rose almost gets engaged to a friend of Robert s, a depressed atheist with issues, but in the end he decides he has too many issues It s not that I thought he would be much of an asset to Rose but I was aggrieved by his refusal to grow and change Robert gets to know the local Squire, who has written controversial intellectual books, and starts writing his own book about religious history This book gives a lot of weight to intellectual shifts as a force, and a lot, or all, of the shifts represented are very 1888 It s a book very rooted in its time, that wants to speak to 1888 people And it did It was, allegedly, the best selling novel of the nineteenth century But you re not going to want to read it if you don t have even a cursory interest in late Victorian stances on religion After agonising over the bible s authenticity as an historical document Robert decides that he still believes in God and is a big fan of Jesus of Nazareth but doesn t believe he was the Son of God or came back to life His wife finds it very hard to adjust to this But it s still a beautiful story approach but does her best Robert leaves the Church and eventually sets up his own little cult thing I think I found this the least satisfactory part of the novel it s sugary and hasty It s an optimistic looking forward to a reassuring compromise that we know now didn t quite work out It s a very earnest, thorough novel in that Victorian way I would imagine the gentle middlebrow tone helped to make the message that traditional Christianity had had itconvincing


  4. Marc Moss Marc Moss says:

    Mrs Humphrey Ward, she would never have appreciated being listed as Mary Augusta, was one of the most popular and important novelists of her day Robert Elsmere would probably would have been listed as the most important novel for at least ten years after publication 1888 She was extremely popular in America, and was the first author to secure internation writes of her works She is largely forgotten now as she was one the wrong side of the early woman s rights movement She was against it, Mrs Humphrey Ward, she would never have appreciated being listed as Mary Augusta, was one of the most popular and important novelists of her day Robert Elsmere would probably would have been listed as the most important novel for at least ten years after publication 1888 She was extremely popular in America, and was the first author to secure internation writes of her works She is largely forgotten now as she was one the wrong side of the early woman s rights movement She was against it, although all her writing confirms this even the biographer seems unable to deal with it, intimating that she probably held a private view contrary to her public one Nonsense It was, I admit a very odd stand for a very modern woman Her husband was worthless and she supported his wealthy lifestyle completely one her own She was a courageous, brilliant woman Her point about womens sufferage was that since women did not have the vote that when issues that they felt deeply about occured that the men in thier lives would be compeled to vote as thier wives wished That once women had the vote, the men could do as they wished and women would never take as much interst in politics as men so would always be in the minority, thus by having the right to vote they would in some ways decrease their power She thought that from weakness thus came strength, and from the strength of the vote, thus weakness.However this book does not deal with those issues, it does deal mainly with a theological split that was occuring with the Anglican Church at that time, and one might do well to peruse a brief history of that struggle before attemptimg this book.Yes the book is long and at times tedious, but noso than say a P.D James modern book It is full of complete characters and a compelling story


  5. Greta Villani Greta Villani says:

    Mrs Ward does here a remarkable work in representing the various elements of nineteenth century belief and doubt as they effect the personal life of the hero, Robert Elsmere, and especially his marriage with Catherine It is an attack on orthodox Christianity and a sort of glorification of the heresy of modernism Every great religion is, in truth, a concentration of great ideas, capable, as all ideas are, of infinite expansion and adaptation states Robert Elsmere Religion must change becaus Mrs Ward does here a remarkable work in representing the various elements of nineteenth century belief and doubt as they effect the personal life of the hero, Robert Elsmere, and especially his marriage with Catherine It is an attack on orthodox Christianity and a sort of glorification of the heresy of modernism Every great religion is, in truth, a concentration of great ideas, capable, as all ideas are, of infinite expansion and adaptation states Robert Elsmere Religion must change because the world is changed What seemed to be a loss, will, in the end, only be a gain.If you are interested in the religious turmoil of the 19th century this is certainly a must read But I suggest you to read also William Gladstone s long critique of the novel Gladstone, many times prime minister of Britain and a devout Anglican of the high church, argues that Christian morality is inseparable from Christian belief The latter is truly the foundation of the former, and once you get rid of Christian belief, Christian morality is destined to collapse


  6. Mauberley Mauberley says:

    I was recently reminded of this novel when I was reading Karen Armstrong s recent book on scripture and I could not have enjoyed itIt is a terrific novel and its depictions of the late Victorian world s reactions to Darwin, David Strauss, Unitarianism, poverty, etc is handled with extraordinary skill Once or twice I found myself wondering how some one writing close to 140 years ago would have known enough to write bits of my biography but that simply speaks to Mrs Ward s sensitivities I was recently reminded of this novel when I was reading Karen Armstrong s recent book on scripture and I could not have enjoyed itIt is a terrific novel and its depictions of the late Victorian world s reactions to Darwin, David Strauss, Unitarianism, poverty, etc is handled with extraordinary skill Once or twice I found myself wondering how some one writing close to 140 years ago would have known enough to write bits of my biography but that simply speaks to Mrs Ward s sensitivities This is not everyone s cup of tea or communion chalice but anyone interested in the issues raised will find it fascinating Wilde said that it reminded him of Arnold s Dogma and Literature with the latter left out All who read this book will benefit immeasurably from reading Gladstone s response to it


  7. Mary Mary says:

    It was amazing to be reading a popular 1888 novel on an iphone The author knew RH Charles, a man my husband is researching, and thus he found this book We were both enjoying reading it at first I gave it up about 60 % through at a point when the spiritual crisis occurred.


  8. Michael Ratnapalan Michael Ratnapalan says:

    A deeply sad novel, at times painful to read I found it tremendously insightful on the relationship between modern forms of Arianism and Pelagianism.


  9. Bill Evans Bill Evans says:

    I had never heard of this author two weeks ago, but HG Wells mentioned her in a novel of his I read recently This is an extremely well written novel set amidst the religious turmoil on late nineteenth century England I intend to look for someof her books Pam, you once said you read The first sentence to gauge if you were interested, or not Well, this is The second second sentence The spring had been unusually cold and late, and it was evident from the general aspect of the lonely West I had never heard of this author two weeks ago, but HG Wells mentioned her in a novel of his I read recently This is an extremely well written novel set amidst the religious turmoil on late nineteenth century England I intend to look for someof her books Pam, you once said you read The first sentence to gauge if you were interested, or not Well, this is The second second sentence The spring had been unusually cold and late, and it was evident from the general aspect of the lonely Westland valley of Long Whindale that warmth and sunshine had only just penetrated to its bare, green recesses, where the few scattered trees were fast rushing into their full summer dress, while at their feet, and along the bank of the stream, the flowers of March and April still lingered, as though they found it impossible to believe that their rough brother, the east wind, had at last deserted them


  10. Edward Edward says:

    A tale of the conflict between faith and knowledge, this novel is in some respect an extended study of the changes to the theological and intellectual life of Victorian Britain Accordingly, it can be highly recommended to historians of the period as useful background reading As a story, it is perhaps over long and the ending feels rushed, but the sensitivity with it addresses the emotional struggle within and between the characters is affecting and convincing.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Robert Elsmere [EPUB] ✺ Robert Elsmere By Mrs. Humphry Ward – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Robert Elsmere Wikipedia Robert Elsmere Ward, Humphry Livres NotRetrouvez Robert Elsmere et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Robert Elsmere broch Achat Livre fnac Robert E Robert Elsmere Wikipedia Robert Elsmere Ward, Humphry Livres NotRetrouvez Robert Elsmere et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Robert Elsmere broch Achat Livre fnac Robert Elsmere Des milliers de livres avec la livraison chez vous enjour ou en magasin avec % de rduction Robert Elsmere by Mrs Humphry Ward Goodreads Robert Elsmere would probably would have been listed as the most important novel for at least ten years after publicationShe was extremely popular in America, and was the first author to secure internation writes of her works She is largely forgotten now as she was one the wrong side of the early woman s rights movement Robert Elsmere ebook ePub Mary Augusta Ward AchatRobert Elsmere Mary Augusta Ward, british novelist who wrote under her married name as Mrs Humphry Ward This ebook presents Robert Elsmere, from Mary Augusta Ward A dynamic table of contents enables to jump directly to the chapter selected Robert Elsmere Victorian Secrets First published in , Robert Elsmere was probably the biggest selling novel of the nineteenth century Inspired by the religious crises of her father, Ward tells the story of an Oxford clergyman who begins to doubt the doctrines of the Anglican church after he encounters the work of German rationalists Robert Elsmere by Mrs Humphry Ward Victorian Robert Elsmere opens in the Lake District, with loving descriptions of the Westland countryside The serious minded Catherine Leyburn prevaricates over whether she should accept the marriage proposal of young clergyman Robert Elsmere, or stay at home to care for her widowed mother Love triumphs over duty, and the couple move to a new living in Surrey Here Elsmere is given access Robert Elsmere Characters eNotes Robert Elsmere, an eager young clergyman who combines strong intellectual interests, particularly in history, with a drive for social reform, particularly improvements in the conditions of the poor Robert Elsmere Ward, Mrs Humphry, Burstein, First published in , Robert Elsmere was probably the biggest selling novel of the nineteenth century Inspired by the religious crises of her father, Ward tells the story of an Oxford clergyman who begins to doubt the doctrines of the Anglican church after he encounters the work of German rationalists Robert Elsmere, by Mrs Humphrey Ward Robert Elsmere meanwhile lay on the grass, his face discreetly turned away, an uncontrollable smile twitching the corners of his mouth Everything was fresh and piquant up here in this remote corner of the north country, whether the mountain air or the windblown streams, or the manners and customs of the inhabitants His cousin s wife, in spite of her ambitious conventionalities, was really.