The Collar MOBI º Paperback

The Collar [Reading] ➿ The Collar By Sue Sorensen – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Combining thematic analysis and stimulating close readings 'The Collar' is a wide ranging study of the many ways heroic or comic shrewd or dastardly in which Christian clergy have been represented in Combining thematic analysis and stimulating close readings 'The Collar' is a wide ranging study of the many ways heroic or comic shrewd or dastardly in which Christian clergy have been represented in literature from George Herbert and Laurence Sterne via Anthony Trollope GK Chesterton TS Eliot and Graham Greene to Susan Howatch and Robertson Davies and in film and television such as 'Pale Rider' 'The Thorn Birds' 'The Vicar of Dibley' and 'Father Ted' Since all Christians are expected to be involved in ministry of some type the assumptions of secular culture about ministers affect than just clergy Ranging across several nations particularly Britain the US and Canada denominations and centuries 'The Collar' encouragescreative and faithful responses to the challenges of Christian leadership and develops awareness of the times when leadership expectations become too extreme Using the framework of different media to make inuiries about pastoral passion frustration and fallibility Sue Sorensen's well informed sprightly and perceptive book will be helpful to anyone who enjoys evocative literature and film as well as to clergy and those interested in practical theology.


9 thoughts on “The Collar

  1. Jamie Howison Jamie Howison says:

    Sorenson has done an impressive job of surveying the way the clerical figure the collar figures in the course of some 200 years of fiction TV and film I bumped into familiar characters Graham Greene's priests for instance who always or less undo me and some I'd never known existed Peter Sellers as a priest in the 1963 film Heavens Above which was fun for a while In the end I longed for less of a broad survey and on just a few of these books or writers I have come to care about I suppose such is the way with a survey book but the downside of that was the nagging so what about the archdeacon in Charles Williams' novel War in Heaven? Why isn't he included? That's always the risk a writer takes with a survey though isn' it? How could she possibly cover it all?


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