Santiago's Children: What I Learned about Life at an


10 thoughts on “Santiago's Children: What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile

  1. Liralen Liralen says:

    Think Little Princes but with less hypeand thoughtfully done In the early 80s Reifenberg—not long out of college—moved down to Chile to spend a year volunteering at an orphanage He knew little Spanish and little about Chile but he had a lot of determination Although I truly wanted to help people he says I also wanted to backpack through the Andes Mountains and visit Machu Picchu in Peru; to walk the white beaches of the Pacific coast of South America and experience the solidarity that people feel living under military rule; to drink Chilean red wine and eat clams out of the shells; to study the stars of the Southern Hemisphere; and to learn about another culture and to speak Spanish well What I wanted was an adventure 36Reifenberg's parents weren't thrilled with the endeavour to say the least they wanted him back in the States working and earning money not volunteering in a not entirely stable country This wasn't helped by the fact that Reifenberg's teenage brother started referring to him as 'Steve God rest his soul' and then just 'God rest his soul'—though in one of the funnier extended anecdotes of the book the entire family started doing this But Reifenberg went for it anyway eventually extending his year to two years and scrapping his plans for law school His family by the way came around I was amazed at how well my family communicated with everyone in Santiago In fact it was disconcerting how much better they seemed to be managing than I did when I first arrived The difference I had been so insistent on learning the right word in Spanish that it often got in the way of communication My family was just interested in communicating however they could 203 Although there's some personal story here and although the book is flavoured with politics especially as Reifenberg's Spanish and cultural awareness improve and he is better able to follow the political climate he keeps the focus right where it should be on Olga the woman who founded and ran the orphanage and on the children The goal here was to keep it small and organised like a family and as Reifenberg tells it Olga succeeded This is amazing There are twenty some people around this table and it runs like clockwork Are these kids always this well behaved? my father asked meWe told the kids I said in English that they would have to go back to the salt mines where they would get only bread and water if they didn't behave themselvesTío what did you say? Verónica asked meMy father things you're wonderful and I do too I responded Verónica beamed I was glad to some extent I guess that both my efforts to teach the kids English and my father's efforts to learn Spanish had not been spectacularly successful 202Nobody's perfect and nobody in this book is perfect; the kids are kids sometimes lovable and sometimeswell stranglable isn't a word is it? But they got by Reifenberg seems aware of the limitations of his role he was a temporary visitor and one without a concrete role at that Perhaps his most significant contributions were a fundraising when he was back in the States leading Olga to be able to buy a house outright and b getting involvement from expats again possibly leading to financial helpMuch later Reifenberg moved back to Santiago for work and he provides follow up information for the kids he worked with It's a very satisfying read


  2. Liz Liz says:

    Read this while living in Santiago; it made a big impression on me The author is an acuaintance of both my brother and my Chilean landlord It opened my eyes to another side of the city I was getting to know but made me feel regret that my time in Chile was so focused on myself and my family and we made no efforts to serve the community we were living in


  3. Pam Pam says:

    I recommend a lot of books Usually this is just a verbal suggestion one that gives people the opportunity to go to the store or their online book purchasing venue of choice to decide for themselves whether or not the book is their cup of tea I rarely though give books to people as presents as I am afraid that what I read will not ultimately satisfy my friends and family or the occasional interested stranger A year after I first read Steven Reifenberg’s Santiago’s Children I can safely say that this is my only pick for gift giving It has become my number one go to bookLike many middle class college grads Steve found himself bound for law school in 1982 uestioning this decision he began looking into alternatives He enlisted the help of several friends who had recently worked abroad looking for a way make even a meager wage while experiencing something less cookie cutter A friend who had recently been in Chile gave him the name of a small children’s home run by a woman named Olga Diaz Needless to say he never made it to Indiana to being his first year He opted out of academia and headed south with nothing but a name and a vague hope of finding fulfillmentWithin the walls of Hogar Domingo Savio Olga Diaz’ cramped but cozy orphanage the tiny heroes of the story painted a tropical version of a Dickens tragedy Most of the children came under Olga’s care through abandonment or abuse their parents and guardians victims of political upheaval or other less noble fates Olga welcomed and still welcomes all with open arms often biting of chunks almost too big to chew Despite the desperate means by which the members come to the home the children are full of energy and wonder engaging their older caregivers in their optimismNearly a decade before Salvador Allende had been killed in the Sept 11th military coup plunging the country into the age of Pinochet’s rule Thus Steve began his stay in a Chile wrecked by economic and political chaos Initially on the outskirts of the political wave Reifenberg Diaz and the children eventually found their own voices and brand of descent in the unfolding social scene as times become desperateOf course the children of Hogar Domingo Savio were not the only youths changed by Steve’s stay Over the span of two years Reifenberg went through a range of monumental and subtle changes that are contrasting albeit familiar to those changes brought to twenty somethings anywhere Perhaps the most moving period of the book came when Steve found himself bed bound for an extended period of time due to illness As a young crusader he felt torn with guilt at appearing completely useless when so much needed to be done After struggling with ethic internally Steve finally rested on the conclusion that until he is able to take care of himself he can be in no shape to help those around him This thesis is a powerful one yet a hard one to completely grasp for many especially those who have launched themselves into the unknown with the intention of helping othersThis is a fantastic little book There is an incredible amount of care given to paint the two Chiles one on the outside where guns and politicians blazed the other painted so beautifully that it was easy to forget the intensely real and desperate backdrop amidst the laughter and lives of the children and their various adventures Far from appealing solely to young expatriates this story will strike en emotional chord with most readers as it is truly a wonderful and moving coming of age story as well as a readable and poignant history of the political climate of past and modern ChileAs Olga’s operation is still alive and well each copy of Santiago’s Children sold will see half of the author’s profits given to the continuing support of work with at risk children in Chile primarily to support the work of the Hogar Domingo Savio now Mi Club Domingo Savio


  4. Chris Chris says:

    50 out of 5 stars A True Delight October 28 2008By C sturgis See all my reviewsREAL NAME I just finished Santiago's Children and I just want to go back and read it all again Steve Reifenberg has written a book that opens the door into a period in a young man's life as he takes risks in discovering his life journey as well into a time in Chile's history in which the country began its new path And rippling throughout the book are the stories of the children at the orphanage as they make sense of their livesWhat is most remarkable about this book is how it weaves together Reifenberg's self deprecating humor the life force and tragedy of the children the courage of the founder of the orphanage the uiet fear of the government and the growing courage of Chileans as they demand greater justice in their livesHonestly I can almost see and hear the laughing yelling of the children as they follow along with Reifenberg on his runs the beating of pots and pans in the evening sky and the precious conversations with the children as they open up their lives and heartsThis is a definite must read It is also one of those rare books that would make a great present to just about anyoneI hope you enjoy it as much as I did


  5. Yaaresse Yaaresse says:

    Against all common sense and advice Reifenberg decided to ditch college for the duration and show up in Chile to help at an orphanage He knew little Spanish less about Chile and almost nothing about orphans The result is a feet to the fire experience of dealing with poverty politics culture shock and all the insane things kids get into without even trying The author manages to see the humor in his situation without making this a comedic story He manages to impart the tragedy and pathos without making it a sob story This was one of my favorite books this year and it may be my favorite memoir ever It was both touching and entertaining Highly recommended


  6. Ryan Wilson Ryan Wilson says:

    Five stars due to the personal relevancy of the book Having lived in Santiago and preparing to leave for an orphanage in Latin America I really enjoyed this story Written by the author 25 years after he spent 2 years at a small orphanage in Chile it did a good job of getting me to think about my upcoming time in Guatemala The book is very clearly written and I read it in about 3 days thanks to my bike being out of commission and my car in the shop I had to take the bustrain everywhere the past few days Thanks Mama for sending it my way I'll get it back to you soon


  7. Adelaide Adelaide says:

    I recognized much less of the Santiago in this book than I expected to A few decades of growth not to mention the return to democracy can have large impacts More than that however I think this book reminded me of how sheltered I was during my time in Chile I lived and studied and hung out in middle or upper class neighborhoods all of the time The world that Steve Reifenberg describes the poverty the alcoholism the joblessness was not something I had to deal with


  8. Lacey Mclaughlin Lacey Mclaughlin says:

    This is one of the best memoirs I have read in a very long time I spent my lunch breaks at work reading it in my car because it was hard to put down If you have a real interest in traveling or moving to another country this is a great book to inspire you Reinfenberg could have easily fallen into so many cliches while writing about culture shock poverty and America's role in developing nations But he managed to put his ego aside and paint a delightful portrait of Chile in the 1980s


  9. Krissy Krissy says:

    As a former volunteer in Chile I found that this book resonated with me on so many levels Steve's honest and endearing chronicle of his struggles living in the hogar shines with truth I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Chile or in international volunteering in general This is certainly a peek behind the curtain It is not always pretty but is ultimately very human and highly satisfying


  10. Quiquebs Quiquebs says:

    I felt really close to Steve and his experience not only with the children but as well in the life moment of deciding what to do with my future I'm really glad to be participating in the blog of Santiago's Children wwwsantiagoschildrencom


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Santiago's Children: What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile [BOOKS] ✭ Santiago's Children: What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile By Steve Reifenberg – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at Find many great new used options and get the best deals for Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile by Steve Reifenberg Santiago's Children What I Learned What I eBook ☆ about Life at Find many great new used options and get the best deals for Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile by Steve Reifenberg Trade Paperback at the best online prices at eBay Free shipping for many products Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile English Edition eBook Santiago's Children: eBook à Reifenberg Steve Farmer Paul commx Tienda Kindle Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile by Steve Reifenberg Paul Farmer NOOK Book eBook Save % Current price is original price is You Save % Sign in to Purchase Instantly Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps WANT A NOOK? Explore Now Get Free NOOK Book Sample Buy As Children: What I eBook ✓ Gift LEND ME See Details Santiago's children what I learned about life at an Get this from a library Santiago's children what I learned about life at an orphanage in Chile Steve Reifenberg Unclear about his future career path Steve Reifenberg found himself in the early 's Children: What I Learned about PDF or working at a small orphanage in a poor neighborhood in Santiago Chile where a Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Santiago's Children What I Children: What I Learned about PDF or Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile by Steve Reifenberg Click here for the lowest price Hardcover Santiago's Children Book Launch | ASCOA Chile in the early s serves as the backdrop of Steve Reifenberg’s new memoir Santiago’s Children What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile about his time working as a volunteer at the Hogar Domingo SavioIn and Chile suffered an economic recession and saw political challenges to General Augusto Pinochet’s rule Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Runner up Bronze Medal Independent Publishers Book Awards MemoirAutobiography Category Unclear about his future career path Steve Reifenberg found himself in the early s working at a small orphanage in a poor neighborhood in Santiago Chile where a determined single woman was trying to create a stable home for a dozen or so children who had been abandoned or abused Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Unclear about his future career path Steve Reifenberg found himself in the early s working at a small orphanage in a poor neighbourhood in Santiago Chile where a determined single woman was trying to create a stable home for a dozen or so children who had been abandoned or abused With little than good intentions and very limited Spanish the year old Reifenberg plunged into the Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Compre online Santiago's Children What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile de Farmer Paul MD Reifenberg Steve na Frete GRTIS em milhares de produtos com o Prime Encontre diversos livros escritos por Farmer Paul MD Reifenberg Steve com timos preos For Santiago's poor housing with dignity | Harvard Readers in the BostonCambridge area can meet Steve Reifenberg on Tuesday November at the Harvard Book Store where he is scheduled to discuss his memoir Santiago's Children What I Learned About Life at an Orphanage in Chile beginning at pm.

  • Paperback
  • 226 pages
  • Santiago's Children: What I Learned about Life at an Orphanage in Chile
  • Steve Reifenberg
  • English
  • 10 June 2016
  • 9780292717428