Pink Sugar Epub º Hardcover

Pink Sugar [Reading] ➿ Pink Sugar By O. Douglas – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Kirsty Gilmour I m but you shouldn t make me say it out loud, makes a home for herself in the Scottish Borders and takes under her wing a gentle old aunt and three motherless children Barbara, Specky Kirsty Gilmour I mbut you shouldn t make me say it out loud, makes a home for herself in the Scottish Borders and takes under her wing a gentle old aunt and three motherless children Barbara, Specky and Bad Bill originally written in the s, Pink Sugar is full of perfectly drawn characters with old fashioned values from a vanished world a world of kindness and good manners, of generosity and self restraint, and yet a world where poverty, illness and bereavement are just below the surface In this society of women with peripheral men, social life centres round afternoon tea we could be in Cranford on Tweed.


10 thoughts on “Pink Sugar

  1. Valerie Kyriosity Valerie Kyriosity says:

    I would put O Douglas in the same category as Jan Karon pleasant domestic fiction The challenging part of this particular title was the vast and incomprehensible swaths of Scots dialect As an unrepentant subvocalizer, I had no idea how to pronounce much of that vocabulary And I m quite sure I d not have known what to do with it even if I d not been trying to pronounce it.There was no one in the book very much like me, but I identified most with Rebecca, the plain old maid When I had to s I would put O Douglas in the same category as Jan Karon pleasant domestic fiction The challenging part of this particular title was the vast and incomprehensible swaths of Scots dialect As an unrepentant subvocalizer, I had no idea how to pronounce much of that vocabulary And I m quite sure I d not have known what to do with it even if I d not been trying to pronounce it.There was no one in the book very much like me, but I identified most with Rebecca, the plain old maid When I had to stop reading yesterday morning with one chapter left to go, hers was the only story line that hadn t been wrapped up, and I knew it couldn t have the happy ending I d ve written But it did have a happy ending, and probably one that was better than my idea.Here s something I realized while I was reading this I am a writer in books a fine line pen in a bright, contrasting color is my weapon of choice , and there were some things I would have marked in this book words to look up later I really should keep a dictionary by my bed and a few particularly pleasing lines but I cannot bring myself to write in a book this old so old it preceded printing date notation conventions Markings in books must be of the same vintage as the printing itself, or they will seem too much like vandalism On that account, I think I prefer a newer, cheaper paperback over a lovelier, older,valuable edition On the other hand, the size smaller than a mass market , shape, and feel of this printing were a treat in other ways, so I m not complaining


  2. Ann Ann says:

    This book from the 1920s belongs squarely in the category of domestic fiction , just like Barbara Pym or Miss Read No major events happen, and much of the plot centers around the trials and tribulation of daily life What made this book worth reading was the fact that these trials of tribulations reflect life in Scotland in the years after WWI Kirsty Gilmour is almost 30 years old Afterthan 20 years of being dragged around from fancy hotel to fancy hotel by a glamorous stepmother, she This book from the 1920s belongs squarely in the category of domestic fiction , just like Barbara Pym or Miss Read No major events happen, and much of the plot centers around the trials and tribulation of daily life What made this book worth reading was the fact that these trials of tribulations reflect life in Scotland in the years after WWI Kirsty Gilmour is almost 30 years old Afterthan 20 years of being dragged around from fancy hotel to fancy hotel by a glamorous stepmother, she is finally able to live as she likes And what she likes, is a cottage of her own, in a quiet Scottish village, and some people to share it with So first she invites an elderly aunt, a sedate character whose main interests in life are knitting, reading religious books, and regular meals, and a limited but kindly interest in her fellow man But that is not enough for Kirsty, who has rashly decided that she wants to live for others She invites 3 motherless children and their governess to spend the summer with her the disconsolate widower is off for a world tour and seems only too happy to dump his children on this willing spinster Kirsty loves taking care of the children, and playing lady bountiful to her poorer neighbors, and even indulges in a little discreet match making there s a bit of Emma Woodhouse in Kirsty She sometimes meets and matches wits with her taciturn landlord, Major Archie, a war hero In the end, the children s father reappears, with a brand new wife, and takes his children away Kirsty s only consolation is that the new wife appears to have a genuine love for children Of course, there have to be some engagements at the end that is a convention of this type of book.I found the book fascinating because it was written shortly after WWI, and the war and its aftermath was present throughout For instance, Kirsty points out sadly that she was so lonely that she didn t even have anyone to lose during the war Her stepmother s callousness is illustrated by the fact that she went on a sightseeing tour of the trenches shortly after the conclusion of the war, purely as a thing to do, whereas most other travelers were there to see the spot where a loved one had died and remember happy times Major Archie lost a leg in the war, and probably has a touch of what we would now call Post traumatic stress syndrome Other aspects of the book that struck me was how many people died, and how young For instance, several young people die of consumption it is hard to imagine how omnipresent that threat was in those pre tuberculostatics days Another theme is that of the destiny and fate of women Kirsty is perfectly happy with her little cottage and her servants, but other women have a much harder life For instance, the local preacher s sister, Rebecca, is a tormented soul She works hard to keep house for her brother, and participates in the activities of the parish in a dutiful, but uninterested manner She has no beauty, no money, no education and seems destined for a life of domestic drudgery until Kirsty arranges a temporary escape for her The tone of the book was somewhat uneven Sometimes it was purely domestic idyll, and sometimes heavier themes were introduced For instance, we suddenly learn that Aunt Fanny is terrified of dying, despite her faith Or there is a passionate exchange between Kirsty, who defends her love of pink sugar hearts a metaphor for a nice, ordered life full of sweetness and lights against Major Archie scynical view of life Rebecca gives Kirsty a piece of her mind when Kirsty goes a little overboard in her paeans to living contentedly in her little cottage, pointing out that Kirsty actually has very little housework to do Summary a romance from the 1920s which may appeal to readers who love Barbara Pym or Rosamunde Pilcher


  3. Ali Ali says:

    Pink Sugar takes place in the fictional Scottish locations of Muirburn, Priorsford, and the delicious sounding house of Little Phantasy O Douglas books are of a domestic type, vintage escapism, where nice things largely happen to nice people in nice places and virtually nothing of the reality of the outside world is allowed in However, do not let the title fool you, although an unashamed feel good read, this is not as syrupy and sweet as the title may lead you to think.Our heroine is Kirsty Pink Sugar takes place in the fictional Scottish locations of Muirburn, Priorsford, and the delicious sounding house of Little Phantasy O Douglas books are of a domestic type, vintage escapism, where nice things largely happen to nice people in nice places and virtually nothing of the reality of the outside world is allowed in However, do not let the title fool you, although an unashamed feel good read, this is not as syrupy and sweet as the title may lead you to think.Our heroine is Kirsty Gilmour a young woman of thirty though she fears she is now dreadfully old returned at last to her beloved Scotland after years abroad with her manipulative step mother Kirsty had hated the endless round of society that hotel life abroad had brought her, a life her step mother had revelled in Now returning to the Scottish Borders of her birth, she is free for the first time in her life, with a good income to live on, and no one to tell her what to do Kirsty is determined to live for others her good and charitable personality making her long to bring happiness to others or at least release them from trouble or unhappiness Her attitude to life is the Pink Sugar of the title an attitude so called by her landlord the apparently grumpy Colonel Home Surely we want every crumb of pink sugar that we can get in this world I do hate people who sneer at sentiment What is sentiment after all It s only a word, for all that is decent and kind and loving in these warped little lives of ours Full review


  4. Cera Cera says:

    Kirsty s stepmother has finally died, leaving Kirsty with money and the freedom to do what she pleases for the first time in her life What she chooses is a small house in Scotland, where she lives with her maiden aunt, has spirited arguments with her upper class landlord, and eventually takes in three children who need a temporary home while their father recovers from grief at their mother s death Kirsty is another one of Buchan s witty heroines, but she s also unabashedly sentimental the pi Kirsty s stepmother has finally died, leaving Kirsty with money and the freedom to do what she pleases for the first time in her life What she chooses is a small house in Scotland, where she lives with her maiden aunt, has spirited arguments with her upper class landlord, and eventually takes in three children who need a temporary home while their father recovers from grief at their mother s death Kirsty is another one of Buchan s witty heroines, but she s also unabashedly sentimental the pink sugar of the title comes from her telling off her landlord when he suggests that she s a weak person because she prefers the nicer side of life I really liked Kirsty s combination of strength and sweetness, and I felt the novel did a good job of showing her growth from a somewhat self absorbed person to someone who can recognise what s best for others, and see proffered romantic love when it comes from an unanticipated corner


  5. Emma Emma says:

    Yes, it s a dollop of soothing syrup , if you will, but it s also absolutely DARLING.


  6. Christine McCann Christine McCann says:

    I enjoyed reading this novel It was a comfortable read with some interesting characters In fact, some of the characters reminded me of those from Anne of Green Gables and the successive books For example, Kirsty is a bit like Anne with her lack of relatives, her love of nature, and her optimism and kindness, as well as some mishaps Although Kirsty is older and wealthier than Anne, they both seek a home and family Rebecca in Pink Sugar is very similar to Katherine, Anne s fellow teacher in A I enjoyed reading this novel It was a comfortable read with some interesting characters In fact, some of the characters reminded me of those from Anne of Green Gables and the successive books For example, Kirsty is a bit like Anne with her lack of relatives, her love of nature, and her optimism and kindness, as well as some mishaps Although Kirsty is older and wealthier than Anne, they both seek a home and family Rebecca in Pink Sugar is very similar to Katherine, Anne s fellow teacher in Anne of Windy Poplars Compare the two characters speeches to Anne and Kirsty, and their subsequent fates Perhaps the Scotch background of LMM on PEI helps to explain some of the similarities, and the authors shared similar insights about village society and certain kinds of personalities and opportunities for women in these circumstances at this time


  7. Karen Karen says:

    I really liked the first half of this book, very witty By the second half I was starting to get slightly irritated by the main character but all in all still an entertaining, if somewhat dated, read.


  8. Lucina Lucina says:

    This book and Five Windows by D.E.Stevenson were my first two Greyladies purchases and the first two I read Of the two, I preferred the D.E.Stevenson.The heroine of this novel takes on three children for the summer, while their recently widowed father is abroad She, Kirsty, is an orphan herself, though a wealthy young woman, and has finally settled in the house of her dreams in the Scottish Borders Her home and the surrounding countryside are well described, together with various local charac This book and Five Windows by D.E.Stevenson were my first two Greyladies purchases and the first two I read Of the two, I preferred the D.E.Stevenson.The heroine of this novel takes on three children for the summer, while their recently widowed father is abroad She, Kirsty, is an orphan herself, though a wealthy young woman, and has finally settled in the house of her dreams in the Scottish Borders Her home and the surrounding countryside are well described, together with various local characters, both high and low born, including the minister, the Laird, the local Lady Author and assorted servants and farm workers Unlike another reviewer here, some of my favourite bits in this book were the sections in broad Scots I really liked the way the author gives the speech of the villagers as it would have been spoken Conversations such as those between the dour, prim housekeeper and the cheerful, comparatively bawdy cook add colour and humour to the narrative, as well as the local rhymes and sayings that are quoted.I mostly enjoyed the book but became slightly bored towards the end


  9. Peggy Peggy says:

    Thoroughly lovely read


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