Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family


    Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family Grateful Kids in an Entitled World, Kristen shares the ups and downs in her own family s journey of discovering why it s healthiest not to give their kids everything Teaching them the difference between want and need is the first step in the right direction With many practical tips and anecdotes, she shares how to help kids become hardworking, fulfilled, and successful adultsIt s never too late to raise grateful kids Get ready to cultivate a spirit of genuine appreciation in your family and create a home in which your kids don t just say but mean thank you for everything they have."/>
  • Audiobook
  • 6 pages
  • Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family Learned That Saying No Can Lead to Life's Biggest Yes
  • Kristen Welch
  • 12 January 2019

10 thoughts on “Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family Learned That Saying No Can Lead to Life's Biggest Yes

  1. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    Most every parent wants the best for his or her child But what happens when this concept is taken too far, and instead of improving their children s lives, parents end up creating entitled tyrants This is the concept Kristen Welch explores in her new book, Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World Welch is the writer of the popular blog, We Are THAT Family In addition to being a good writer, she s honest, funny, approachable and real Through personal stories, Welch shares her experience of Most every parent wants the best for his or her child But what happens when this concept is taken too far, and instead of improving their children s lives, parents end up creating entitled tyrants This is the concept Kristen Welch explores in her new book, Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World Welch is the writer of the popular blog, We Are THAT Family In addition to being a good writer, she s honest, funny, approachable and real Through personal stories, Welch shares her experience of noticing that her children were not appreciative of the material blessings they d been given in life, and also not learning the value of hard work typical American kids, right Because gratitude is so important to Welch, she is determined that her family will change course Welch is completely relatable, too She shares her mistakes and instances where she wishes she could have had a do over In this realm she does not appear preachy or like someone who knows it all She acknowledges, as we all know, that parenting is the hardest job any of us will love and sometimes most definitely not love to do So much of this book resonated with me other parts did not, which I ll get to in a moment My kids have opportunities and experiences my husband and I couldn t have dreamed of when we were growing up We try very hard not to spoil them, and it s so important to me that they are grateful for the blessings they have, know the meaning of hard work, and recognize that most people in the world do not live like they do The book helped me reckon with my own entitlement as well In addition to stories, Welch includes suggested tips and exercises at the end of each chapter based on a child s age.I do feel the need to put a disclaimer in this review Welch is a very conservative Christian She and her husband have devoted their lives to building a running a women s health care center in Kenya, which shows an amazing generosity of spirit Christian themes run through this book and it s published by Tyndale, a Christian publisher Throughout the book, Welch uses several examples of things that are not all right online pornography, bullying, drug alcohol use, etc Most of these are behaviors that parents no matter their creed would agree with much like the idea of gratitude and entitlement However, included with the examples of not all right are references to homosexuality Certainly, many in Welch s core audience will agree with her however, this is where she and I part company I fail to see what this even has to do with gratitude and entitlement and think it does nothing but turn people away from it otherwise a great book I guess this is a sacrifice Welch and Tyndale were willing to make, although I think they would have found a wider audience without the rhetoric.3.5 stars rounded up to 4.Thank you to the author and the publisher for and ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review


  2. Lindsay Lindsay says:

    I couldn t really relate to a lot of the content of this book because the authors children attend public school and have surprisinglystruggles with entitlement then my own home educated children, but it definitely got me prayerfully thinking about how to cultivateof a heart of contentment and thankfulness in my children It was quick and enjoyable to read.


  3. Michele Morin Michele Morin says:

    Grateful Parents Grateful KidsFinally, about ten years ago, the light began to dawn, and you can t imagine how disappointed I was I realized that parenting is not a cause and effect proposition It s not a vending machine in which I insert my actions seizing teachable moments, training in character, consistency in discipline and then am rewarded by equal and corresponding reactions obedience, respect, good behavior.I m a slow learner, so this was earth shattering for me, but .Having sa Grateful Parents Grateful KidsFinally, about ten years ago, the light began to dawn, and you can t imagine how disappointed I was I realized that parenting is not a cause and effect proposition It s not a vending machine in which I insert my actions seizing teachable moments, training in character, consistency in discipline and then am rewarded by equal and corresponding reactions obedience, respect, good behavior.I m a slow learner, so this was earth shattering for me, but .Having said that, Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World by Kristen Welch reminds me that if I want my children to appreciate their blessings and to operate out of gratitude rather than entitlement, I had better be modeling the right heart attitude myself.In the Great Balancing Act called parenting, we are at war against three words Is that all In ourselves, in our kids, Western culture exacerbates our entrenched selfishness in everything from ice cream servings to allowances Enough is never enough.Kristen is writing from the trenches of raising three kids, and so the tone of Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World is NOT we have arrived and here s how your kids can ooze gratitude like our perfect children do She comes alongside her readers with humble offerings Here s what we re doing Here s what others have tried, and that s great, too Kristen s perspective is derived from the knowledge that parents who are willing to fight against the prevailing culture and for an attitude of thankfulness in their children will feel as if they are swimming upstream.My oldest son talked early and often so I can still hear his husky toddler voice saying, There s a difference between a need and a want To me Even so, one need that is common to all kids is their parents love, and ironically, in our culture of possessions and privileges, it is common to find children who are sadly lacking in that need while every want is speedily fulfilled.No one sets out with a goal of spoiling her children, but little daily choices that arise from incorrect thinking accomplish the task over time Kristen unmasks some of these 1 We want our kids to be our friends.2 We re afraid to say no because of the fallout slammed doors, tears, eye rolling, shouting.3.We feel guilty about our circumstances and try to compensate with permissiveness.4.We are busy We eat fast food on the way to one of Junior s three different soccer league practices, take on an extra job to pay for a Disneyland vacation, and don t have time for the slow work of eyeball to eyeball interaction in which we pass on our values.5.We don t want them to fail, so we make things easy for them.6.We don t want them to feel left out, so we cave to the everyone else argument.7.We don t want them to be unhappy.It is not for nothing, then, that Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World provides an end of each chapter assortment of age related hints for going against the flow.For parents Put a plan in place Decide in advance what you will say yes to For toddlers Make cookies together You may eat one for your effort, and then give the rest away to brighten someone s day Teach your children that we don t have to keep everything for ourselves For elementary age Clean out closets and drawers, and instead of giving away only things that they won t miss, urge your kids to include something they really love to share with someone else For tweens teens It may seem to your son or daughter as if she s the only one in her class or he s the only one in his grade or on this planet who isn t fitting in or keeping up But if we are going to compare ourselves to others, let s also compare ourselves to kids who live in poverty The award for most practical feature goes to the chapter called Making Smart Choices about Technology with its related idea of a cell phone contract.Central to all this intentionality and hard work is the goal of introducing kids to the freedom of self discipline to the security that comes from seeing parents follow through on their principles and the self confidence that can only come to kids who have been allowed to struggle a bit and then to solve their own problem before a parent comes swooping in to rob them of the privilege We must love our children enough to make the hard choices that lead to a lifestyle of gratitude.This book was provided by Tyndale Momentum, an imprint of Tyndale House Publishing, in exchange for my review I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission s 16 CFR, Part 255 Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising


  4. Renee Renee says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here DNF I hardly ever review a book I could not finish The author spoke at my MOPS group about her nonprofit so this book intrigued me We all want grateful kids I also want my child to be loving and caring and open minded to ALL people I was enjoying the book and like the end of the chapters where there are practical examples prompts to do for each age level but in chapter 2 she began to assert her religion on views and was not very loving to all of God s children Came across judgmental and pr DNF I hardly ever review a book I could not finish The author spoke at my MOPS group about her nonprofit so this book intrigued me We all want grateful kids I also want my child to be loving and caring and open minded to ALL people I was enjoying the book and like the end of the chapters where there are practical examples prompts to do for each age level but in chapter 2 she began to assert her religion on views and was not very loving to all of God s children Came across judgmental and preachy


  5. Laura Laura says:

    A must read for today s Christian parent I knew this book was going to be good from the very first chapter, because it called me to task on things that I needed to change Me the parent Not just my kids And these are hard things to do because so much of what goes into raising grateful children flies in the face of what our society expects us to do The tasks aren t easy, but the stakes couldn t be any higher If you want to start down the path toward raising grateful, empowered, generous an A must read for today s Christian parent I knew this book was going to be good from the very first chapter, because it called me to task on things that I needed to change Me the parent Not just my kids And these are hard things to do because so much of what goes into raising grateful children flies in the face of what our society expects us to do The tasks aren t easy, but the stakes couldn t be any higher If you want to start down the path toward raising grateful, empowered, generous and self sufficient children in a Christ centered household, do them a favor and pick up this book


  6. Scott Kennedy Scott Kennedy says:

    I leapfrogged into this book from another book that mentioned it I was captured by the title There were some really helpful practical ideas in this book Welch includes a section at the end of each chapter where she summarises key ideas for parents, toddlers, young children and teens In these sections there are nuggets of gold For instance, as a family, Welch recommends a gratitude journal or box, where family members enter what they are grateful for These can then be pulled out at a later I leapfrogged into this book from another book that mentioned it I was captured by the title There were some really helpful practical ideas in this book Welch includes a section at the end of each chapter where she summarises key ideas for parents, toddlers, young children and teens In these sections there are nuggets of gold For instance, as a family, Welch recommends a gratitude journal or box, where family members enter what they are grateful for These can then be pulled out at a later date and discussed She suggests limiting gifts and gimmes for example at Christmas , and making cookies for others rather than for the family so that children learn the joy of giving Another interesting practical idea is having simple Monday night dinners of rice and beans to help give our families a dose of perspective a reminder of how much of the world eats every night.Another highlight for me was her section on the dangers of a child centred home Welch demonstrates the dangers of this arrangement It teaches kids to expectof others and less of themselves, it reinforces selfishness, narrows a child s perspective and inhibits awareness of others As a father of four young children who have not yet entered the world of technology, I found the chapter on making smart choices about technology helpful Sensible and practical ideas in this section included no devices at the dinner table, a weekly no media day, no electronic devices in the bedroom after 9 00, parental authority to read any messages children get and no online interaction with people you don t know One final area which I found helpful was the importance of teaching the value of money and work Welch believes that parents should make work part of the family routine Her teenagers are responsible for doing their own washing, and she connects work done to money or a salary for her children I have to go against the trend of 5 star reviews, because while this book contained some really good practical advice, I could not say it was amazing It wasn t I found that many of the headings chapter section were misleading in that they didn t accurately capture what the chapter section was about It felt at times like the author wanted to fit a story in, and wasn t quite sure where to put it One example among a number of others is chapter 6 which is entitled Cultivating Obedience , but which had a lengthy section on working on cleanup areas in parenting which had little or nothing to do with cultivating obedience


  7. Anna Anna says:

    Although I have no children and, sadly, most likely never will, I found this a valuable look into what entitlement and gratitude means with some good ideas about how to achieve agrateful life Welch is strongly Christian and as someone coming from a different branch of Christianity some of her language took a little extra work to understand, so this may not be a great fit for someone from another faith tradition.


  8. Lori Lori says:

    Did not finishI love the idea of this book, but I couldn t get past chapter 2 when she got super judgemental I m comfortable reading books with a Christian viewpoint, but not to the extent she is dismissive and judgemental of any information that does not come from her specific religious belief Yuck.She actually warned against tolerance How about a little gratitude for all our differences


  9. Rachel Rachel says:

    I was hoping this book would address issues of gratitude and thankfulness Instead, only a small portion of this book focused on cultivating thankfulness The bulk of the book addressed a multitude of other parenting issues, such as technology usage, peer pressure, obedience, and the like.


  10. Karen Karen says:

    This is a great book It applies to kids of all ages and it is backed up with biblical principles.


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Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family Learned That Saying No Can Lead to Life's Biggest Yes[PDF / Epub] ⚣ Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family Learned That Saying No Can Lead to Life's Biggest Yes ✈ Kristen Welch – Buyprobolan50.co.uk But everyone else has it If you loved me, you d get it for me When you hear these comments from your kids, it can be tough not to cave You love your children don t you want them to be happy and to fit But everyone else has Kids in eBook ☆ it If you loved me, you d get it for me When you hear these comments from your kids, it can be tough not to cave Raising Grateful Epub / You love your children don t you want them to be happy and to fit in Kristen Welch knows firsthand it s not that easy In fact, she s found out Grateful Kids in PDF ↠ that when you say yes too often, it s not only hard on your peace of mind and your wallet it actually puts your kids at long term risk In Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World, Kristen shares the ups and downs in her own family s journey of discovering why it s healthiest not to give their kids everything Teaching them the difference between want and need is the first step in the right direction With many practical tips and anecdotes, she shares how to help kids become hardworking, fulfilled, and successful adultsIt s never too late to raise grateful kids Get ready to cultivate a spirit of genuine appreciation in your family and create a home in which your kids don t just say but mean thank you for everything they have.


About the Author: Kristen Welch

Kristen Welch is a Kids in eBook ☆ mom just like you and me only funnier Her blog, We Are THAT Family wearethatfamily is read by over , women a month, who enjoy her Raising Grateful Epub / often hilarious, always honest reflections on motherhood, marriage, and Christian life In , she went to Kenya as a blogger for Compassion International, and regularly contributes to online magazine Blissfully Domestic Grateful Kids in PDF ↠ and In Courage, an inspirational blog for women She lives in Texas with her husband and three children.