A Time to Die: The Untold Story of the Kursk Tragedy

A Time to Die: The Untold Story of the Kursk Tragedy [Reading] ➶ A Time to Die: The Untold Story of the Kursk Tragedy ➽ Robert Moore – Buyprobolan50.co.uk On a quiet Saturday morning in August , two explosions one so massive it was detected by seismologists around the world shot through the shallow Arctic waters of the Barents Sea Russia s prized submar On a quiet Saturday morning to Die: PDF/EPUB ¾ in August , two explosions one so massive it was detected by seismologists around the world shot through the shallow Arctic waters of the Barents Sea Russia s prized submarine, the Kursk, began her fatal plunge to the ocean floor Award winning journalist Robert Moore presents a riveting, brilliantly researched account of the deadliest submarine disaster A Time PDF or in history Journey down into the heart of the Kursk to witness the last hours of the twenty three young men who survived the initial blasts Visit the highly restricted Arctic submarine base to which Moore obtained secret admission, where the families of the crew clad for news of their loved ones Drawing on exclusive access to top Russian military figures, Moore Time to Die: PDF Æ tells the inside story of the Kursk disaster with factual depth and the compelling moment by moment tension of a thriller From the Trade Paperback edition.


10 thoughts on “A Time to Die: The Untold Story of the Kursk Tragedy

  1. Eric_W Eric_W says:

    The Kursk s brief life spanned a revolutionary period She had been planned under Gorbachev, the keel had been laid down under Yeltsin, but when finally commissioned, the Soviet Union had self destructed and she was commissioned into the Russian Northern Fleet, prepared for a war that seemed less and less likely Huge there is a drawing of a 747 superimposed on a schematic of theKurskthat dwarfs the airplane, theKurskand her sister ship were the pride of the increasingly desti The Kursk s brief life spanned a revolutionary period She had been planned under Gorbachev, the keel had been laid down under Yeltsin, but when finally commissioned, the Soviet Union had self destructed and she was commissioned into the Russian Northern Fleet, prepared for a war that seemed less and less likely Huge there is a drawing of a 747 superimposed on a schematic of theKurskthat dwarfs the airplane, theKurskand her sister ship were the pride of the increasingly destitute Russian navy the captain of theKursktook home less than 1,000 per year and often a paymaster would be left behind a cruise to stand at the bank to make sure the crew s salaries were collected before the money disappeared from the bank In fact, one of the officers on board was suing the government and Navy for pay for the sailors TheKursks final voyage was part of a very ambitious a word used advisedly because it was not sure that money would be available to pay for the fuel war game intended to impress Putin who had suggested he wanted to restore the Russian military to its former glory The plan was also to use the cover of the war games to sneak one of the Russian boomers under the summer ice of the Arctic past watching American submarines proving they could deploy a nuclear sub without the United State knowing about it Things began to go wrong from the start Several missile launches failed spectacularly and the pressure to send good news to the Defense Ministry was pushing crews to take risks In the final phase of the war games four submarines were to elude discovery and fire a test torpedo at the Peter the Great a large cruiser I suspect most of us have some hydrogen peroxide lying around the house Simple stuff, just water with an extra oxygen atom But bring it into contact with copper and you have the recipe for a serious disaster as the peroxide tries to eject the extra oxygen atom creating immense heat Once started, nothing will stop the process until all the combustible material is gone The practice torpedo that blew up had never been used in practice and the HTP used in the propulsion system had leaked on to the casing, made of copper and brass It exploded with immense heat and force In the forward torpedo room of the Kursk, there were live torpedoes with real TNT in them When they cooked off in a secondary explosion, it registered on the Richter scale as 3.5 magnitude It blew a huge hole in the pressure hull of the sub The blast was halted only by the nuclear vessel shielding This prevented the controls rods from being knocked out of alignment and a potential runaway reactor Instead of a submarine accident it might have been an ecological disaster The British had known of the dangers of HTP The Sidon had a torpedo explode without warning while at the dock in 1955 Twelve men were killed and an investigation revealed the HTP high test peroxide had leaked out of chamber in the torpedo on to some metal and combusted.They never again carried HTP on a British submarine.To make matters worse, the emergency buoy that was supposed to release and send emergency signals if any number of serious conditions arose, had been disabled while on a patrol in the Mediterranean the summer previous, because they were terrified it would deploy accidentally and alert American or British forces to the subs presence By 1999, the fleet was suffering from neglect and lack of funds Of seventy cranes at the home port, only twenty worked, meaning that torpedoes could only be loaded on a few of the boats Sailors were paid only six months out of the year and some of the subs were reduced to hauling food One commander connected his nuclear power plant to the town s electrical grid so at least some of the navy families could be warm and have light during the long winter By a quirk of fate, after the explosion, which blew an immense hole in the side, the sub settled to the floor of the sea in a rather even fashion Had it sunk nose first, some 130 feet would have extended above the surface, since the depth of water where she sank was only 350 feet deep, much less than the length of the vessel 23 sailors survived the sinking initially, but remained entombed in the stern of the sub We have a pretty good idea of what happened to the men marooned in the rear of the sub A twenty eight year old officer, Lt Kolesnikov, began writing a precise journal of who was there and events as long as he could There must have had some makeshift light at the beginning and adequate oxygen for his writing is precise There were 23 men, all doing reasonably well who could have been saved had the Russians acted with haste, understood what was happening accepted the aid of foreign experts As the author notes, making this an international rescue should not have been embarrassing since no one nation could martial all the technology and forces needed But the idea that Russians would let Americans or NATO forces anywhere near their premiere sub was anathema Russian communications failures being rather common coupled with a distinct desire not to be the bearer of bad tidings, the double explosion on a sub in the midst of the Russian fleet and during a simulated wartime exercise, went unmentioned if not unnoticed There was no reward for being curious Everyone else in the world was very curious as seismic registration needles around the globe measured something. They and the entire US intelligence apparatus were at complete loss to understand what had happened Communication to the outside world was abysmal at best The Russians, always eager to put the best foot forward made it seem like everything was great World interest was accordingly peaked and now they had figurative floodlights on theKurskProblem was that Norwegian seismologists had registered the explosions on Saturday, not on Sunday as the Russians had claimed So the world knew they were lying from the git go And they also uttered the word collision This was the worst possible scenario from a political standpoint There had been several very embarrassing and potential deadly collisions in these waters and the new quieting technologies made them evenlikely In one instance a Russia sub surfaced right underneath and American spy sub And the Cold War was supposed to be over Both subs limped back to base But it was a close thing Ironic, because the Russians had suffered the loss of the S 80than thirty years before in almost exactly the same location It disappeared without a trace, but the Russians were determined to find it and discover what might have gone wrong as it was the first of its type They never gave up and 8 years after it disappeared it was discovered and the cause of the sinking identified During a storm, water began to slosh into the vessel through an open hatch A sailor was ordered to shut it, but no matter how hard he tried he couldn t The reason was simple He had been trained on a different model of submarine in which the hatch handle was screwed shut in the opposite direction He had tried so hard to close it the threads on the screw mechanism had been completely stripped Another irony was that precisely the characteristics that made the sub so difficult to find, i.e its design to suppress noise and not reflect sonar signals, worked against saving the sailors trapped in section nine.I also intend to read.Cry from the Deep The Sinking of the Kursk, the Submarine Disaster That Riveted the World and Put the New Russia to the Ultimate Test


  2. Keen Keen says:

    Why did I raise my son For what You probably don t have children of your own, so you don t understand You don t understand anything You eat so well, and now you re just sitting here and our boys have nothing This is no way to live I cannot say anything else I m so fed up with all this chaos I ve had enough My husband served for twenty five years For what What was it all for Tell me, for what Just for me to bury my son I ll never forgive you for this Tear off your medals and shoul Why did I raise my son For what You probably don t have children of your own, so you don t understand You don t understand anything You eat so well, and now you re just sitting here and our boys have nothing This is no way to live I cannot say anything else I m so fed up with all this chaos I ve had enough My husband served for twenty five years For what What was it all for Tell me, for what Just for me to bury my son I ll never forgive you for this Tear off your medals and shoulder boards These were the words shouted out by the mother of one of the victims to IIya Klebanov, the deputy prime minister, as he evaded issue after issue, before a stranger crept up behind her, and plunged a syringe into her thigh She eventually collapsed, as she was carried away from the meeting This is how Russian authorities choose to deal with the victims of national disasters in the 21st century.The Kursk was the largest attack submarine ever built She was the height of a four storey building and longer than two football pitches Submerged she displaced 23 000 tons Moore explains the ultimate cause of the disaster was down to an HTP 65 76 torpedo manufactured in Kazakhstan , suffering from corrosion and inadequate servicing, it exploded in tube number four and unleashed hell The torpedo exploded in a massive fireball at exactly 11.28 27, with a force equivalent to 100 kg of TNT The blast registered 1.5 on the Richter scale with the torpedo doors still shut, the energy burst backwards into the compartment, travelling atthan a thousand metres a second, engulfing all seven men in a rush of flames It had taken a decade to design, three years to build, and just 135 seconds to destroy.We learn about various previous incidents, involving intrusive US submarines in Russian waters, like the USS Baton Rouge colliding with a Russian submarine in 1992 and badly damaging it, forcing the Pentagon to issue a public apology Then only one year later, in 1993, the USS Grayling caused a similar farce It begs the question, could you imagine the level of uproar and outrage if the circumstances were reversed Other submarine disasters are spoken of, in particular the case of the Soviet S 80 which disappeared in 1961 and wasn t discovered until 1968 Though the details surrounding it where suppressed by the Soviets for decades Apparently the disaster was caused by accidental flooding.Moore paints a grim picture of Vidyayevo, where many of the sailors were based and where the Kursk set sail from He also gives us the details surrounding the history and founding of the Kola Peninsula as a port and its role in the Barents Sea and the Arctic We get some gritty background on the history, decline and state of the Northern Fleet The Russian Navy seeks to hide the statistics, but in 1999, on Northern Fleet bases alone, at least twelve sailors committed suicide In the year 2000, eighteen men took their own lives, most shooting themselves in the head with their service pistols The facts and stats, Moore has managed to compile in relation to so many factors surrounding the disaster are exceptional Deep below the waves we enter a hidden world of wonderful new terminology, one that speaks of thermal scarring , face squeeze and acoustic tiles We even get a fascinating glimpse into the curious and little known world of deep sea divers He explains that, So many survival issue flow from an underwater accident that it s been compared to being caught in an avalanche, trapped in a blaze, adrift in outer space and lost at sea all at the same time Most of the submarines operating today have a crush depth of around 1000 metres If a submarine sinks in deeper water, the boat will collapse as if squeezed by a giant fist and the crew has no chance of survival The full horror and the dilemma facing the crew members of the Kursk, who had survived the initial blast, is captured and related with forensic detail Captain Lieutenant Kolesnikov s recovered hand written accounts are spine chilling in their simplicity and understatement Elsewhere he tells us that, The human body can tolerate a far greater depletion of oxygen than it can an increase in carbon dioxide A build up of CO2 will kill long before a shortage of oxygen As the CO2 reaches a level above 3% of the atmosphere, the human body begins to experience what doctors call, respiratory distress Distress is a medical euphemism, however, and considerably understates what the body undergoes The body craves fresh air And breathing becomes deeper and faster As the levels of CO2 continues to build The body loses the ability to get rid of the carbon dioxide it is producing The mind cannot understand why inhalingair is not providing relief, and breathing becomesanddesperate With every breath comes aintense craving for oxygen Finally, the realisation hits that it is impossible to achieve the intake of air The torture is psychological as well as physical there is a constant cycle of the expectation of relief followed by the hope being dashed This is a truly riveting and gripping account of a largely avoidable disaster, burdened with primitive rescue resources nowhere near fit for purpose Their so called rescue services inadequacies were cruelly exposed to the world The Rudnitsky, the main rescue vessel was fighting a losing battle from the start In spite of the many brave and enduring attempts to rescue the sailors, the operation was doomed, hindered by ineptitude of poor chain of command, and ultimately strangled by increasing budget cuts Military bureaucracy would do what it always does in any part of the world, lie, deceive and evade and do anything in its power to maintain self preservation Through a combination of pride and paranoia the Russians had left it at least 48 hours too late to accept foreign help When the Norwegians and the Brits eventually did arrive, it didn t help when the Russians continued to stall, delay and obstruct in any way they could Losingvital and precious hours on top of the days they d already wasted Putin had only been in power a matter of months, when the disaster happened This was an opportunity to act and show his mettle and capabilities For five days he chose to remain on holiday and say nothing to the press It took Vladimir Putin ten days before he decided to visit the families and victims at the port where the Kursk had left from He also showed up to meet them four hours late Little did the people know that this cold and ruthless behaviour would be a chilling and ominous sign of what was to come during his lengthy and punishing presidency.So overall this is a truly exceptional piece of work I was hooked from the opening pages and found myself rationing it, to savour the unfolding story longer Moore teases out the tension and builds the drama, giving it the feel of a fast paced, paperback thriller The sheer scale of research involved is something special and overall this is a truly remarkable achievement


  3. Ken Hammond Ken Hammond says:

    A Time to Die the Kursk Disaster, by Robert Moore On reflection world headlines focused on some of the crew surviving many days after the incident but evidence points to no one surviving the first 24 hours Heroism shown by the Russian sailors who bravely attempted rescue with outdated equipment, all this set against the complete shambles by Russian officials who tried to cover up their mess Felt real sorrow for the grieving families and friends that were left behind Interesting technical det A Time to Die the Kursk Disaster, by Robert Moore On reflection world headlines focused on some of the crew surviving many days after the incident but evidence points to no one surviving the first 24 hours Heroism shown by the Russian sailors who bravely attempted rescue with outdated equipment, all this set against the complete shambles by Russian officials who tried to cover up their mess Felt real sorrow for the grieving families and friends that were left behind Interesting technical details about the Kursk was for myself great, but really using nuclear powered submarines isn t mankind s greatest idea, a technical achievement that needs to be replaced with something that wouldn t cause a huge unprecedented environmental disaster Robert Moore delivered it all in an easy to follow manner


  4. Marcie Marcie says:

    Yep, another submarine disaster book with another unimaginative title What a weird kick This one started slow and then about halfway through became a page turner Moore did his homework He was able to get interviews with many of those involved in the rescue operation You may remember that the Kursk was a Russian nuclear submarine that sank in August 2000 with over 100 men on board in the Barrents Sea It was interesting to contrast this one with my recent reading of The Terrible Hours about Yep, another submarine disaster book with another unimaginative title What a weird kick This one started slow and then about halfway through became a page turner Moore did his homework He was able to get interviews with many of those involved in the rescue operation You may remember that the Kursk was a Russian nuclear submarine that sank in August 2000 with over 100 men on board in the Barrents Sea It was interesting to contrast this one with my recent reading of The Terrible Hours about the rescue in 1939 of the sailors from the US submarine Squalus


  5. Denis Denis says:

    I rode US submarines for over 20 years and you do not think about what can happen This book would make me rethink my career path.


  6. Hans Brienesse Hans Brienesse says:

    A good account and well written It describes intensely the reactions and inactions of a multitude of persons from the sailors lost at sea to the hesitancy of some of the Russian naval hierachy and the eagerness and frustrations of the civilian and naval would be rescuers The writing is descriptive without embellishment and it appears that every effort has been made to present this as an account rather than a story Who were the heroes those who stood up to the Russian politics in spite of the A good account and well written It describes intensely the reactions and inactions of a multitude of persons from the sailors lost at sea to the hesitancy of some of the Russian naval hierachy and the eagerness and frustrations of the civilian and naval would be rescuers The writing is descriptive without embellishment and it appears that every effort has been made to present this as an account rather than a story Who were the heroes those who stood up to the Russian politics in spite of their personal consequences, those who made ready internationally at a moments notice to obey the unwritten law of the sea to save all regardless of political creed, and finally those who went to sea in substandard machines and conditions and were let down by their masters.All in all an enjoyable and accurate read


  7. Realini Realini says:

    Kursk, written by Robert Rodat and directed by Thomas VinterbergSeven out of 10There is much to celebrate in a drama that tells the story of the submarine disaster that took place in 2000 and in which the Russian leadership showed its ugly, mean, inhuman face.Instead of reading this note, I would suggest that you access Variety and look at the excellent review posted there, albeit it would make you avoid the film, given that it is quite critical of it.The saga of the submarine made the headlines Kursk, written by Robert Rodat and directed by Thomas VinterbergSeven out of 10There is much to celebrate in a drama that tells the story of the submarine disaster that took place in 2000 and in which the Russian leadership showed its ugly, mean, inhuman face.Instead of reading this note, I would suggest that you access Variety and look at the excellent review posted there, albeit it would make you avoid the film, given that it is quite critical of it.The saga of the submarine made the headlines around the world and the callousness, cruelty of those who lead Russia became once again evident for those who have eyes and a minimal understanding of events.The eternal leftist, guerilla fighters, people like Corbyn, Maduro, Trump would agree with anything Putin says and does, including sentencing sailors to die because they are inept and refuse aid from the West.The director is the incredible Thomas Vinterberg, famous for the astonishing Festen and the acclaimed Jagten, but the critic from Variety is right to point out the shortcomings of this mega production.The cast could not includeiconic figures Max von Sydow if only for his presence in the masterpieces signed by Ingmar Bergman and he has a place in the history of cinema, along with some other major gods has the role of a vile character Vladimir Petrenko.As one of the leaders of the Russian Navy, he boasts and manifest a criminal arrogance after the calamity is produced, refusing to accept the international offers of helpIt must be noted though that in spite of the fact that this is surely a villain and the orphans are right in refusing to shake his hand when the funeral and religious service is organized, he is one of the less relevant ones.The Absolute Monster is missing from this picture, alas Vladimir Putin was the ultimate commander in chief and the one who would not agree to a loss of face, the saving of his subjects with foreign vessels, an intervention that would highlight the precarious, disastrous state of equipment, the economy, vessels, technology everything in other words and would mean a humiliating PR stunt.Let the sailors die, rather than admit to the truth in the meantime, fueled by revenues form gas, oil and other natural resources, the Russian army has seen its budget increase and important sums of money have been spent for better equipment, although that economy is still smaller than Italy s and much of the noise made is just an effort to punch above its weight.In short, an accident takes place on board the submarine Kursk and the officials use their usual propaganda and lies to pretend that it was in fact a collision with a foreign vessel and not the decrepitude of that others were in the same condition warship which caused the catastrophe.They try to use the only resource they have for such an emergency, but it does not do the job and the British and others offer immediate support Colin firth is majestic as Commodore David Russell.Peter Simonischek is another fabulous, sensational, phenomenal actor who has mesmerized, ravished audiences with the recent, resplendent, one of the best films ever made Toni Erdman.He has the role of Admiral Vyacheslav Grudzinky, who is in command of the fleet and the submarine and when the disaster strikes, he is engaged in the effort to save his men.When all that the Russian fleet has becomes useless which it looks like it was to begin with he talks with Commodore Russell the two had met each other before the calamity.Tragically, his acceptance of the British support is not tolerated by his superiors who demote him, stall the British when the loathsome Petrenko leads the talks and they are concerned with their image and the idea that adversaries would steal secrets from their ancient vessel.The attitude of the Russians Putin in fact, for he is the Supreme Leader, the Tyrant who gives the orders is consistent, they have no qualms about using polonium on one of their own the late Litvinenko or novichok, as in the recent Salisbury attack, invade the Ukraine, meddle in elections in America albeit their puppet there, The stupid Donald denies it, for he believes the dictator and not his own agencies and elsewhere.What are a few sailors in this equation, where the Great Vladimir and his acolytes are concerned with the Glory of Mother Russia Not much indeed There is no spoiler alert, for the end of this saga is known and it does detract from the pleasure of trying to find what happens, although the details of the loathsome, barbaric stand of those who should stand by their service men there were no women and there are none on their submarines, we can be sure of that, even if it might be a state secret and instead sentence them to die with monstrous viciousness


  8. Aaron Aaron says:

    A horrifying chapter in submarine history is detailed here from all points of view most of them the dubious and criminal mindsets of the Russian military Unmaintained, deadly torpedoes explode inside a massive craft, reducing the surviving crew of sailors to prisoners inside one compartment All of this taking place only 350 feet below the surface of the freezing Russian Arctic ocean What develops outside this tragedy is hard to fathom, as national security distrust, botched rescue equipment, A horrifying chapter in submarine history is detailed here from all points of view most of them the dubious and criminal mindsets of the Russian military Unmaintained, deadly torpedoes explode inside a massive craft, reducing the surviving crew of sailors to prisoners inside one compartment All of this taking place only 350 feet below the surface of the freezing Russian Arctic ocean What develops outside this tragedy is hard to fathom, as national security distrust, botched rescue equipment, miscommunications, disharmony at the top, and, most of all, godless politics prevent the already neglected men in the sub the dignity of a prompt and professional rescue And all 22 sailors perish Moore s information is consistently fascinating, whether he s profiling the poverty stricken, barren community of the Kola Peninsula Naval base, the infighting amongst pompous generals, the relationships between the rescue operations But most of all, the book is a profile of the Russian military its profound fear of the truth, and the belief that deceit pays Here, the idea that bad news is best un delivered is flattened Once Putin actually faces the grieving families, it s fortunate, for both the author and historical record, that a hidden tape recorder was also in attendance


  9. Sean Sean says:

    An excellent book concerning the tragedy of the sinking of the unsinkable cruise missile submarine the Kursk caused by a faulty torpedo that exploded on board Many of the requirements for a successful rescue existed it sank during a major naval exercise settling upright in calm, shallow and clear water and there were no radiation leaks from the nuclear reactors However as Moore explains an underwater accident has been compared to, being caught in an avalanche, trapped in a blaze, adrift in o An excellent book concerning the tragedy of the sinking of the unsinkable cruise missile submarine the Kursk caused by a faulty torpedo that exploded on board Many of the requirements for a successful rescue existed it sank during a major naval exercise settling upright in calm, shallow and clear water and there were no radiation leaks from the nuclear reactors However as Moore explains an underwater accident has been compared to, being caught in an avalanche, trapped in a blaze, adrift in outer space and lost at sea all at the same time To make matters worse he outlines in detail the, Kremiln s stumbling an inept response to the crisis Reading this book has given me a new respect for the submariners who potentially put their lives at risk on a daily basis Sadly this won t be the last submarine disaster for example the loss of 44 lives when an Argentine submarine sank in 2017


  10. Stephen Heiner Stephen Heiner says:

    A gripping and important read about was a tragedy many years in the making and a very good snapshot on a Russia at the very beginning of Vladimir Putin s leadership one of the greatest weaknesses in the Russian military a reluctance to probe and question and an unwillingness to pass bad news up the chain of command p 49 Reporting an unpalatable truth in the Russian military is a dangerous activity p 50 If sailors had to die in defense of Russia s secrets, so be it Men had died in A gripping and important read about was a tragedy many years in the making and a very good snapshot on a Russia at the very beginning of Vladimir Putin s leadership one of the greatest weaknesses in the Russian military a reluctance to probe and question and an unwillingness to pass bad news up the chain of command p 49 Reporting an unpalatable truth in the Russian military is a dangerous activity p 50 If sailors had to die in defense of Russia s secrets, so be it Men had died in the past protecting much less The Kursk was muchthan a home for 118 men p 130


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