The Widow's Broom PDF ↠ The Widow's ePUB ´


    The Widow's Broom PDF ↠ The Widow's ePUB ´ could chop wood and fetch water, feed the chickens and bring the cow in from the pasture It could even pick out simple tunes on the piano Or this As days went by, the broom seemed as innocent and hardworking as ever Though it had learned to do many things, sweeping brought it special pleasure It was, after all, a broom Van Allsburg chose to give life to an THE WIDOW S BROOM polarexpress ple,broom, took, woodChris Van Allsburg s rich text contains sev eral words that may be dif cult for evenadvanced readers, providing an excellent opportunity to teach children about reread ing and using context clues to help when they come to a word they don t know Children may make connections between The Widow s Broom and fairy tales that are familiar to Teacher s Guide for The Widow s Broom by Chris Soon the broom could chop wood and fetch water, feed the chickens and bring the cow in from the pasture It could even pick out simple tunes on the piano Or this As days went by, the broom seemed as innocent and hardworking as ever Though it had learned to do many things, sweeping brought it special pleasure It was, after all, a broom Tell the students that Van Allsburg chose."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 32 pages
  • The Widow's Broom
  • Chris Van Allsburg
  • English
  • 05 May 2019
  • 9780395640517

10 thoughts on “The Widow's Broom

  1. Calista Calista says:

    This isn’t necessarily a Halloween book. It’s set in the fall and there is a witch in it, but it’s really an anytime book. I’m going to go ahead and put it in the holiday reviews I do, but I read this earlier in the year and it was fun.

    The artwork is Stunning and unbelievable. This is a beautiful book. So much love and detail went into the making of it.

    A witch is flying in the sky and her broom is old and it dies and falls out of the sky. She lands in the vegetable garden of a kindly woman living alone. She brings the witch inside and lets her heal. The witch recovers and she has a friend come and pick her up while the lady is sleeping. The broom is left at the house and the woman thinks it’s now a normal broom so she uses it. One day, it starts sweeping on its own. The woman thinks this is great, but it doesn’t stop sweeping and drives her crazy. So, she teaches it new chores to do and it plays the piano too, one note at a time. A neighbor sees this and thinks its evil and soon everyone has heard of this broom and comes to see it. Then the neighbor boys start messing with the broom and the broom defends itself. I love how this plays out. I think you should read it.

    It’s a clever story. It’s a longer story, but it’s a fun one during the Halloween season. It’s not really scary, there are witches and ghost and it’s a delight to read.

    The nephew thought this was hilarious. He loved the broom flinging the dog away into the sky (it’s not hurt). He thought this was a fun story and he gave this 3 stars. The niece read this one with us. I lured her in tonight. She loved the artwork and she thought the story was lighthearted and fun. She gave this 3 stars too.


  2. Ronyell Ronyell says:

    Widow

    “The Widow’s Broom” is a haunting story from the great mind of Chris Van Allsburg and it is about how a lonely widow named Minna Shaw finds a friend in a witch’s broom, but is threatened by the villagers to get rid of the broom because the know that it is witch crafted. “The Widow’s Broom” may have some controversial material about witchcraft, but it is a brilliant read for children who love haunting stories.

    Chris Van Allsburg makes this story haunting yet memorable at the same time as it details the story of friendship between a widow and her broom and the bond that Minna Shaw and the broom share together will definitely show children about the importance of friendship even in the worse of times such as when the broom was being harassed by the villagers because it was witch crafted. Chris Van Allsburg’s illustrations are highly beautiful and haunting at the same time as the images are mainly in black and white giving the story a haunting and old fashioned feel since this story probably took place during the 1700s and the image that stood out the most was the image of the broom itself as its handle actually curves when it is doing the work for Minna and because the broom looks so innocent and friendly, many children would actually like the broom instead of fear it.

    Widow

    Parents should know that the theme of witchcraft in this book might be too sensitive to readers who do not approve of witchcraft, even though personally, this subject does not bother me so much since I am a huge fan of Harry Potter, but the broom in this book was friendly and he only threw up the Spivey boys and the dog because they were harassing the broom. Depending on your views on the subject on witchcraft, parents should talk about this book with their children and see how they handle the witchcraft theme.

    “The Widow’s Broom” is a brilliant book about the importance of true friendship and will be an instant treat for children who love reading haunting books. I would recommend this book to children ages five and up due to the witchcraft theme might be scary for smaller children.

    Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

    Banner


  3. Abigail Abigail says:

    Brilliant picture-book practitioner Chris Van Allsburg - two-time winner of the Caldecott Medal, for Jumanji and The Polar Express , as well as a Caldecott Honor, for The Garden of Abdul Gasazi - delivers a deliciously spooky reading experience with The Widow's Broom, a book which boasts both an engrossing story, and gorgeous illustrations. Witches' brooms don't last forever, it begins, proceeding to unfold the story of widow Nina Shaw, who aids the injured witch who crash-lands in her field, and is rewarded with the mostly magic-less broom that she leaves behind. Mostly magic-less, but still enchanted, the broom becomes a helper and companion for the lonely widow, assisting her with the chores, and playing the piano for her. Until, that is, the widow's frightened and superstitious neighbors, led by the vindictive and nosy Mr. Spivey, decide that the broom must be the work of the devil...

    As with all good stories, The Widow's Broom can be read and understood on a variety of levels, whether it be as a spooky tale of magic, suitable for the Halloween season, or as a meditation on the dangers and futility of superstition, and (implied) religious intolerance. The idea that we often create a world in which our fears are brought to life, through a kind of self-fulfilling prophecy - Mr. Spivey believes that the broom is evil and dangerous, and his sons, having doubtlessly picked up on this idea, persecute the broom, which retaliates in kind, proving that it can be very dangerous indeed - is subtly conveyed in the story, as is the notion that things are rarely as they seem (love that surprise ending!). The illustrations are simply breathtaking: done all in black and white, they have a kind of sepia tone to them, and ably capture the depths of shadow and presence of light, in each scene being depicted. There is a sense of mystery and magic here, that is perfectly suited to the tale at hand. I think my favorite image was of the witch, grasping her billowing cloak, her face turned to the side: so powerful, so frightening and beautiful, all at once!

    With a strong story, complete with surprise ending, and beautifully rich artwork, The Widow's Broom is a book I highly recommend: to anyone who is looking for engagingly witchy tales (at Halloween, or any other time of the year), or who is an admirer of Van Allsburg's artwork!


  4. Melki Melki says:

    I absolutely LOVED this book! Contained within these magical pages are an unfortunate witch, a kindly and patient widow, some superstitious neighbors and the most industrious broom since, well, this guy -

    description

    Truly wonderful!


  5. Arlene Allen Arlene Allen says:

    I love, love, love how Van Allsburg refrains from making the witch old and ugly. The broom - steals my heart.


  6. Barbara Barbara says:

    This is one of my favorite Chris Van Allsburg books. As he often does in his picture books, the author/illustrator plays with reality and fantasy, adding a twist at the end. When a witch falls from the sky, she leaves behind her broom as thanks to Minna Shaw for helping her recover. Minna doesn't expect much from the broom, but it has magical powers and sweeps her floors and chops her wood. After her neighbor Mr. Spivey considers it the devil's handiwork and his two sons accost the broom, several members of the community decide to confiscate and destroy it. Minna gets the last word, though, since the spirit of the broom comes back to haunt the Spiveys. Just as I wince when I see that picture of the broom brandishing an axe in the woods, I smile every time I see that last illustration showing the contented Minna Shaw, relaxing and keeping her secret. If the neighbors wouldn't leave Minna and her broom alone, the two of them will take matters into their own hands. This book provides much conversational grist, and I like it more each time I read it.


  7. Tracey the Bookworm Tracey the Bookworm says:

    A nice little tale for Halloween


  8. Mary H. Mary H. says:

    An enchanting book with beautiful artwork-just loved this!


  9. David David says:

    Witches' brooms don't last forever. They grow old, & even the best of them, one day, lose the power of flight.... On very rare occasions, however, a broom can lose its power without warning, & fall, with its passenger, to the earth below ... which is just what happened one cold autumn night many years ago. So begins The Widow's Broom, the gentle, captivating book by Chris Van Allsburg. One morning the lonely widow Minna Shaw finds a wounded, sky-fallen witch in her vegetable garden. The witch disappears before dawn, but leaves her old, presumably defunct broom behind. Minna begins to use it around the house. However, one morning, Minna sees the broom sweeping by itself! Opportunistically, she trains it to chop wood and fetch water.

    When the neighbors find out about this wicked, wicked thing (posing as an innocent, hardworking broom), they accost the widow and demand that the broom be burned. (Goodreads summary)

    A hauntingly beautiful tale by Van Allsburg that is both a great read aloud and a thoughtful look at superstition, bullying and resourcefullness. The story effectively shows how
    people often seek to destroy what they don't understand out of fear rather than trying to learn more about what they are afraid of. In the process some readers may will look at their own attitudes toward others. The broom's stand against bullying and the widow's resourcefulness in dealing with the angry farmers and her bigoted neighbors is very satisfying.

    The masterful sepia toned illustrations draw one into the story through perspective and make you feel on edge with the shadowing and bare trees.

    Parents should be aware of the theme of witchcraft in this book that might be too sensitive to some readers who do not approve of witchcraft.

    The big format makes this perfect for reading aloud. For K - 3rd, those who love haunting stories and Van Allsburg fans.


  10. Meredith Meredith says:

    A widow comes into possession of witch's broom.

    As happens on rare occasions, a broom suddenly loses its power one night, and both it and its witch crash to earth. After landing in the kitchen garden of a widow's farmhouse, the witch hitches a ride home but leaves the broom behind. The widow begins using it like an ordinary broom before she discovers that it hasn't lost all its magic after all.

    At first the widow is frightened, but the broom is a hard worker and eager to help. Soon it soon becomes her friend and helper, doing chores around the farm and keeping the lonely widow company. Of course, nosy neighbors quickly find out about the broom, and the menfolk of this unnamed section of New England declare the broom's domestic skills to be the work of the devil. They attempt to destroy it, but the widow and the broom have the last laugh.

    The black and white illustrations, framing the scenes from often unusual angles and perspectives, enrich the story. The broom reminds me of the Mickey Mouse cartoon The Sorcerer's Apprentice but with deadpan realism rather than outright comedy.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The Widow's Broom[Read] ➵ The Widow's Broom By Chris Van Allsburg – Buyprobolan50.co.uk The Widow s Broom Wikipedia The Widow s Broom Van Allsburg, Chris Livres NotRetrouvez The Widow s Broom et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasionThe Widow s Broom th Anniversary The Widow s Broom Wikipedia The Widow s Broom Van Allsburg, Chris Livres NotRetrouvez The Widow s Broom et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasionThe Widow s Broom th Anniversary EditionNotRetrouvez The Widow s Broom th Anniversary Edition et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion The Widow s Broom by Chris Van Allsburg The Widow s Broom is a haunting story from the great mind of Chris Van Allsburg and it is about how The Widow's ePUB ´ a lonely widow named Minna Shaw finds a friend in a witch s broom, but is threatened by the villagers to get rid of the broom because the know that it is witch crafted The Widow s Broom may have some controversial material about witchcraft, but it is a brilliant read forThe Widows of Broome by Arthur W Upfield When two beautiful widows in a small secluded Australian town are murdered, Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte tries to find the killer The Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte Novels Arthur WilliamTeaching Children Philosophy The Widow s The broom and the witches can be seen as a group of people that are strange, different, and to be feared by the townspeople The way people treat the broom is related to how the people treat the whole population of witches The children taunt the broom just like a bully would taunt a child on the playground who may be of a different race, sexuality, or even just because they have The Widows Broom DrLestersKids Soon the broom could chop wood and fetch water, feed the chickens and bring the cow in from the pasture It could even pick out simple tunes on the piano Or this As days went by, the broom seemed as innocent and hardworking as ever Though it had learned to do many things, sweeping brought it special pleasure It was, after all, a broom Van Allsburg chose to give life to an THE WIDOW S BROOM polarexpress ple,broom, took, woodChris Van Allsburg s rich text contains sev eral words that may be dif cult for evenadvanced readers, providing an excellent opportunity to teach children about reread ing and using context clues to help when they come to a word they don t know Children may make connections between The Widow s Broom and fairy tales that are familiar to Teacher s Guide for The Widow s Broom by Chris Soon the broom could chop wood and fetch water, feed the chickens and bring the cow in from the pasture It could even pick out simple tunes on the piano Or this As days went by, the broom seemed as innocent and hardworking as ever Though it had learned to do many things, sweeping brought it special pleasure It was, after all, a broom Tell the students that Van Allsburg chose.


About the Author: Chris Van Allsburg

Chris was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan on June , , the second child of Doris Christiansen Van Allsburg and Richard Van Allsburg His sister Karen was born in Chris’s paternal grandfather, Peter, owned and operated a creamery, a place where milk was turned into butter, cream, cottage cheese, and ice cream It was named East End Creamery and after they bottled the milk and made the ot.