The Granta Book of the American Short Story, Volume Two


10 thoughts on “The Granta Book of the American Short Story, Volume Two

  1. Paul Bryant Paul Bryant says:

    This did not knock me out but lemme tell you it would ve if it had fell from the top shelf and caught me a curt blow upon the cranium It s a whopper I think my reviewing career would have come to a sudden halt I read it over about four years and finished it this week Well of course I would like to spin some grand theory about The Short Story And Its Vastly Underappreciated Importance but who has the time Not you, not me What I can say is that now right now is a golden age, specifically This did not knock me out but lemme tell you it would ve if it had fell from the top shelf and caught me a curt blow upon the cranium It s a whopper I think my reviewing career would have come to a sudden halt I read it over about four years and finished it this week Well of course I would like to spin some grand theory about The Short Story And Its Vastly Underappreciated Importance but who has the time Not you, not me What I can say is that now right now is a golden age, specifically in America I could name you six or seven brilliant practitioners of the art of the literary 45 rpm, only one of whom is in this vast volume So we need a New New Granta Book The recent stuff is wilder, rantier, less judicious, nothe freezing psychological insights and ironed lapels of 70s and 80s, just the weep and the woof and the weft and the raving madness of the life we try to lead now They are my pied pipers and I am a very willing rat


  2. Marck Bailey Marck Bailey says:

    Any collection of short stories by different authors is going to have its highs and lows There are plenty of lows in this, but about one third of the stories resonated with me Among my favorites were John Cheever s Reunion, which managed, in probably only 1,000 words, to give us everything we needed to know about the history between a father and son and did so with much humor Tom Franklin s Grit, which managed to toe the catwalk between darkness and roller coaster throughout its end Any collection of short stories by different authors is going to have its highs and lows There are plenty of lows in this, but about one third of the stories resonated with me Among my favorites were John Cheever s Reunion, which managed, in probably only 1,000 words, to give us everything we needed to know about the history between a father and son and did so with much humor Tom Franklin s Grit, which managed to toe the catwalk between darkness and roller coaster throughout its ending which, as every good story should be, was shocking yet inevitable George Saunders rollicking CivilWarLand in Bad Decline, which reminded me of how a ghost story written in the spirit of Chuck Palahniuk might sound like This story was unlike any other in the collection and, combined with Richard Ford s spectacular introduction which lays out a sound philosophy for short story writing , is worth the price of at least the paperback version of this collection.Other notable stories for me included Bharati Mukherjee s The Management of Grief though that may be because I remember the Pan Am Lockerbie disaster so well Stuart Dybek s The Palatski Man what can I say I m a Chicagoan Tobias Wolff doing what he does best writing about childhood in Firelight Ann Beattie s The Rabbit Hole as Likely Explanation, where the character comes to grips with her mother s age induced loss of reality Kevin Canty s edgy Blue Boy, a coming of age tale with a sense of danger that kept me turning pages Jhumpa Lahiri s beautiful A Temporary Matter, capturing a couple s communication issues in a unique way Nathan Englander s The Tumblers, showing a fresh take on one sliver of the Holocaust Adam Haslett s quiet, desperate Devotion, recalling the best moments of the early scenes from Atonement ZZ Packer s The Ant of the Self, which takes a lot longer than Cheever to build a similar father son relationship but keeps itself moving briskly and Julie Orringer s Stars of Motown Shining Bright, which takes the overused trick of adding a gun to the story and really makes it work in its favor.I ve been taking short story writing classes recently and so have been immersing myself in this art, and taking on this book right now with all its disappointments and its high points has really helped put me in the right frame of mind for the work I m doing


  3. WordsBeyondBorders WordsBeyondBorders says:

    Anthologies are a dicey thing You may either get some real good works and some new authors you have never heard of or if the editor is not up to the mark, you get some listless collection of works by the usual well known names I have been lucky in this regard several times, I read Juan Rulfo the first time in one such latin american anathology The Granta Anthology is a a collection of 44 stories written in the second half of the 20th century by American writers Since the editor Richard Ford Anthologies are a dicey thing You may either get some real good works and some new authors you have never heard of or if the editor is not up to the mark, you get some listless collection of works by the usual well known names I have been lucky in this regard several times, I read Juan Rulfo the first time in one such latin american anathology The Granta Anthology is a a collection of 44 stories written in the second half of the 20th century by American writers Since the editor Richard Ford himself is no mean short story writer, I picked this one up I got the second volume of this anthology The first was apparently published in 1992 Ford has added some new writers in this collection released some years ago again.The collection has the usual suspects like Updike, Cheever, Annie proulx Some like me, who is in India does not have immediate access to the latest emerging writers, even if I read about someone in the net or in some magazine, it is pretty difficult to get their books here This collection also introduced to me several writers whom I have missed for so long The writers who affected me most were George Saunders , Ann Beattie , Sherman Alexie and Deborah Eisenberg The crazy thing about Ann Beattie is that, the day I purchased this book, I also saw the complete collection of Ann Beattie s works Since I had not heard of her, I passed the book The next time I went to the store, the book was not there This is another problem with collections, you read something by a writer and start wanting to read his her complete works, but infuriatingly they are not available That sucks.The collection offers a solid cross sectional view of the American short story form and even the American society over the years, across the various geographical locations, lifestyles There is a story by Cheever, which has it s resonance in another story written by ZZ Packer nearly 40 years later.But I would not say it is exhaustive since for e.g there is only 1 story by a native american Sherman Alexie Even afro americans are not represented much This is not much surprising considering whatever I have read about the subjugation of native americans and afro americans But I would have expected a much better representation of them There are also a couple of writers of Indian origin, Jhumpa Lahiri and Bharathi Mukherjee , which is actually a bit surprising considering the representation of native and afro americans I personally would not go in for reading either of their works in future, but hey, that s just me Maybe someone with a better knowledge of the american society and literary history over the years would be able to answer this better Overall this is a fulfilling collection of short stories 700 pages long I was not disappointed totally with any of them One of the best books that I have read in the last 2 years


  4. Sam Sam says:

    It s very difficult to make a bad collection out of the kind of writers in this book, and this isn t a bad collection, it s just a less necessary one than the original Granta Book of the American Short Story There s no arc here the eighties minimalists have won over the seventies experimentalists only Barthelme gets any space in this edition and the new people just aren t good enough to merit inclusion I mean, Z.Z Packer Nell Freudenberger It s not entirely Ford s fault, because the ea It s very difficult to make a bad collection out of the kind of writers in this book, and this isn t a bad collection, it s just a less necessary one than the original Granta Book of the American Short Story There s no arc here the eighties minimalists have won over the seventies experimentalists only Barthelme gets any space in this edition and the new people just aren t good enough to merit inclusion I mean, Z.Z Packer Nell Freudenberger It s not entirely Ford s fault, because the earlier edition came at the heels of what was pretty much a golden age for the short story, and there hasn t been as much action in recent years The best selections here are about playing catch up Denis Johnson, Deborah Eisenberg, Thom Jones One gets the sense that he s grabbing the newest writers without knowing what s out there No Charles D Ambrosio, no Rebecca Curtis, no Miranda July love her or hate her , no Dan Chaon, no Jonathan Lethem, no Aleksander Hemon And man, Ford s essay is just such a piece of self satisfied claptrap, and he practically admits to not reading much contemporary short fiction So why edit the book


  5. Bryan Murphy Bryan Murphy says:

    This is a splendid read In a boring, didactic introduction, the editor bangs on about the shortest of the stories, tempting the reader to ignore all the others, which would be a shame The stories are all well crafted, though they vary considerably in content and style Inevitably, not all will be to every reader s taste, and though I found a few distasteful, I was happy enough to be forced out of my comfort zone for a short time In several, I was struck by how surprisingly different the USA i This is a splendid read In a boring, didactic introduction, the editor bangs on about the shortest of the stories, tempting the reader to ignore all the others, which would be a shame The stories are all well crafted, though they vary considerably in content and style Inevitably, not all will be to every reader s taste, and though I found a few distasteful, I was happy enough to be forced out of my comfort zone for a short time In several, I was struck by how surprisingly different the USA is from Europe indeed, one or two made it seemalien than cyberpunk Now that I ve finished this hefty volume, I ll be down my local Library to look forby many of its authors


  6. Jody Jody says:

    As far as variety goes, this book has it But the choices within did not impress me I like short stories, but I think that I am not a fan of modern short stories I want closure and most of these stories lacked closure They did not even read like a story, butlike an exercise in wriitng and cleverness.


  7. Carolyn Carolyn says:

    Read in 2008 with Dad.What a behemoth of a book for us to have picked for our challenge As you may remember, we wound out spreading this one out and reading it in both July AND October and even then it was touch and go whether we d finish this one as it s just too darn big for me to carry around and I do apparently almost all my reading in transit.There were a few oldies thrown in at the beginning, where I thought what is this one doing here i.e., given the composition of the rest of the Read in 2008 with Dad.What a behemoth of a book for us to have picked for our challenge As you may remember, we wound out spreading this one out and reading it in both July AND October and even then it was touch and go whether we d finish this one as it s just too darn big for me to carry around and I do apparently almost all my reading in transit.There were a few oldies thrown in at the beginning, where I thought what is this one doing here i.e., given the composition of the rest of the choices , but for the most part I thought these were good stories My favorites were The Pugilist at Rest by Thom Jones, Firelight by Tobias Wolff, Blue Boy by Kevin Canty, Anthropology by Andrea Lee and CivilWarLand in Bad Decline by George Saunders And my least favorite was the Mary Gaitskill next to which I wrote just Ick


  8. Ronald Wise Ronald Wise says:

    Following an inspiring Introduction by editor Richard Ford, I was disappointed by the early selections in this collection Perseverance paid off, however, as I was pleased to later encounter over a dozen excellent stories I had not yet read in other anthologies These included The Artificial Nigger by Flannery O Conner Oh, Joseph, I m So Tired by Richard Yates Killings by Andre Dubus Helping by Robert Stone Get Some Young by Barry Hannah Ancient History by Richard Bausch The Following an inspiring Introduction by editor Richard Ford, I was disappointed by the early selections in this collection Perseverance paid off, however, as I was pleased to later encounter over a dozen excellent stories I had not yet read in other anthologies These included The Artificial Nigger by Flannery O Conner Oh, Joseph, I m So Tired by Richard Yates Killings by Andre Dubus Helping by Robert Stone Get Some Young by Barry Hannah Ancient History by Richard Bausch The Rabbit Hole as Likely Explanation by Ann Beattie A Romantic Weekend by Mary Gaitskill Two Dogs by Steve Yarbrough People Like That Are the Only People Here Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk by Lorrie Moore Aurora by Junot D az The Tumblers by Nathan Englander Devotion by Adam Haslett The Ant of the Self by Z.Z Packer and Lucky Girls by Nell Freudenberger


  9. Tanner Wendel Tanner Wendel says:

    This massive collection gets a 60 40 like dislike ratio from me The stories that stood out the most for a variety of reasons, and authors I plan to read into Ship Island The Story of a Mermaid, Elizabeth Spencer The Half Skinned Steer, Annie Proulx Get Some Young, Barry Hannah The Rabbit Hole as Likely Explanation, Ann Beattie Work, Denis Johnson Nothing to Ask For, Dennis McFarland Blue Boy, Kevin Canty The Plague of Doves, Louise Erdrich People Like That Are the Only People Here C This massive collection gets a 60 40 like dislike ratio from me The stories that stood out the most for a variety of reasons, and authors I plan to read into Ship Island The Story of a Mermaid, Elizabeth Spencer The Half Skinned Steer, Annie Proulx Get Some Young, Barry Hannah The Rabbit Hole as Likely Explanation, Ann Beattie Work, Denis Johnson Nothing to Ask For, Dennis McFarland Blue Boy, Kevin Canty The Plague of Doves, Louise Erdrich People Like That Are the Only People Here Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk, Lorrie Moore The Toughest Indian in the World, Sherman Alexie Aurora, Junior D az Devotion, Adam Haslett


  10. Keith Keith says:

    An amazing anthology of American short stories, nothing short of magic in effective storytelling.


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The Granta Book of the American Short Story, Volume Two ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☆ The Granta Book of the American Short Story, Volume Two Author Richard Ford – Buyprobolan50.co.uk In , Richard Ford edited and introduced the first Granta Book of the American Short Story It became the definitive anthology of American short fiction written in the last half of the twentieth century In , Richard Ford edited and introduced the Book of Kindle Ï first Granta Book of the American Short Story It became the definitive anthology of American short fiction written in the last half of the twentieth century an exemplary choice in the words of The Washington Post with stories by Eudora Welty, John Cheever, Raymond Carver, and forty others demonstrating how much memorable power can lie in the briefest narration In the years since, Ford has been reading new stories and rereading old ones and selecting new favorites This new collection features than forty stories, including some he regretted overlooking the The Granta Kindle - first time around, as well as many by a new generation of writers among them Sherman Alexie, Junot D az, Deborah Eisenberg, Nell Freudenberger, Matthew Klam, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Z Z Packer None of the stories though a few of the writers were in the first volume Once again, Ford s introduction is an illuminating exposition of how a good story is written by a master of the craft.

  • Paperback
  • 736 pages
  • The Granta Book of the American Short Story, Volume Two
  • Richard Ford
  • English
  • 10 April 2019
  • 1847080405

About the Author: Richard Ford

Richard Ford, born February , in Jackson, Book of Kindle Ï Mississippi, is an American novelist and short story writer His best known works are the novel The Sportswriter and its sequels, Independence Day, The Lay of the Land and Let Me Be Frank With You, and the short story collection Rock Springs, which contains several widely anthologized stories Comparisons have been drawn between Ford s work and the writings of John Updike, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway and Walker Percy His novel Independence Day won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in , also winning the PEN Faulkner Award in the same The Granta Kindle - year.