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The Celtic Twilight (Forgotten Books) ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☉ The Celtic Twilight (Forgotten Books) Author W.B. Yeats – Buyprobolan50.co.uk This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You The Celtic PDF \ may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.


10 thoughts on “The Celtic Twilight (Forgotten Books)

  1. Bill Kerwin Bill Kerwin says:

    The Celtic Twilight 1902 is a book of encounters The encounters Yeats writes of are the meetings between the Irish people and the faeries, but equally interesting are those other encounters the meetings between the young Protestant poet and the Catholic Irish who tell him their ancient stories so that he can write them down in this book.Although Yeats poetry even the early, overly precious stuff is always filled with beauties to admire, his prose can sometimes be pedantic and rather dry I The Celtic Twilight 1902 is a book of encounters The encounters Yeats writes of are the meetings between the Irish people and the faeries, but equally interesting are those other encounters the meetings between the young Protestant poet and the Catholic Irish who tell him their ancient stories so that he can write them down in this book.Although Yeats poetry even the early, overly precious stuff is always filled with beauties to admire, his prose can sometimes be pedantic and rather dry In Celtic Twilight, though, Yeats every utterance is informed by the richness of Irish speech, and the result is a balanced, lively prose, filled with vivid images and revealing asides.Two things struck me during my reading of this book The first was how much I love the Irish conception of the faeries, for they are neither minor demons like the Scots variety nor good little souls like the treacly British type No, Irish faeries are neither malevolent nor particularly merciful Instead, they are mischievous to the core, with unquenchable appetites for confusion But they may just as easily do you a good turn as a bad one It all depends on the nature of the performance.Secondly, I was struck with the emotional intensity in some of the tales of beautiful women in the book Yeats met Maude Gonne in 1889 thirteen years before the publication of Celtic Twilight It was then, as Yeats has said, that the troubling of my life began, and you can see the signs of the continual troubling here There is the old square castle, Ballylee, inhabited by a farmer and his wife, and a cottage where their daughter and their son in law live, and a little mill with an old miller, and old ash trees throwing green shadows upon a little river and great stepping stones I went there two or three times last year to talk to the miller I have been there this summer, and I shall be there again before it is autumn, because Mary Hynes, a beautiful woman whose name is still a wonder by turf fires, died there sixty years ago for our feet would linger where beauty has lived its life of sorrow to make us understand that it is not of the world An old man brought me a little way from the mill and the castle, and down a long, narrow boreen that was nearly lost in brambles and sloe bushes, and he said, They say she was the handsomest girl in Ireland, her skin was like dribbled snow he meant driven snow, perhaps, and she had blushes in her cheeks .An old weaver, whose son is supposed to go away among the Sidhe the faeries at night, says, Mary Hynes was the most beautiful thing ever made My mother used to tell me about her, for she d be at every hurling, and wherever she was she was dressed in white As many as eleven men asked her in marriage in one day, but she wouldn t have any of them There was a lot of men up beyond Kilbecanty one night, sitting together drinking, and talking of her, and one of them got up and set out to go to Ballylee and see her but Cloon Bog was open then, and when he came to it he fell into the water, and they found him dead there in the morning She died of the fever that was before the famineThere is an old woman who remembers her, at Derrybrien among the Echtge hills, a vast desolate place She says, The sun and the moon never shone on anybody so handsome, and her skin was so white that it looked blue, and she had two little blushes on her cheeksBut a man by the shore at Kinvara, who is too young to remember Mary Hynes, says, Everybody says there is no one at all to be seen now so handsome it is said she had beautiful hair, the colour of gold She was poor, but her clothes every day were the same as Sunday, she had such neatness And if she went to any kind of a meeting, they would all be killing one another for a sight of her, and there was a great many in love with her, but she died young It is said that no one that has a song made about them will ever live long She died young because the gods loved her These poor countrymen and countrywomen in their beliefs, and in their emotions, are many years nearer to that old Greek world, that set beauty beside the fountain of things, than are our men of learning She had seen too much of the world but these old men and women, when they tell of her, blame another and not her, and though they can be hard, they grow gentle as the old men of Troy grew gentle when Helen passed by on the walls.If that old square castle, Ballylee sounds familiar, it should Yeats bought it fourteen years after Celtic Twilight was published, and lived their during the summer They call it Yeat s Tower now Even if Yeat couldn t be close to the beautiful Maud Gonne, he could be close to the ghost of Mary Hynes instead


  2. Alex Alex says:

    In his youth Yeats was a member of the Golden Dawn, an occult society he wrote this book during that time, and it s widely seen as a manifesto about his belief in faeries and magic and such And it is that but it s not what you think When he says Let us go forth, the tellers of tales, and seize whatever prey the heart long for, and have no fear Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet p 4 he s saying that he believes in magic, yes, but hi In his youth Yeats was a member of the Golden Dawn, an occult society he wrote this book during that time, and it s widely seen as a manifesto about his belief in faeries and magic and such And it is that but it s not what you think When he says Let us go forth, the tellers of tales, and seize whatever prey the heart long for, and have no fear Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet p 4 he s saying that he believes in magic, yes, but his definition of belief is subtler than people give him credit for He s talking about the power of myth in building culture and identity, and his book, broadly a collection of Irish folklore gathered from bars and washerwomen, will be about the impact of myth on the Irish character You you will make no terms with the spirits of fire and earth and air and water You have made the Darkness your enemy We we exchange civilities with the world beyond p 93 And that difference that the Irish consider themselves allied with the faeries and imps that inhabit their land does say something important about the Irish Compare that statement to the array of superstitions cataloged in Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, where anything and everything is a bad omen And remember how Americans have historically felt about witches We have a different,fearful attitude toward the unknown The quote above isn t about faeries it s about the Irish.A warning note as he got older, Yeats grew out of his Golden Dawn days By the time he reprinted Celtic Twilight and two other short works in Mythologies, he was embarrassed by some of hisimaginative points, and he ended up editing all the fun out of it Mythologies will still do as a collection of Irish folklore, but it s not as weird and beautiful as it originally was Here s my review of Mythologies, which doesn t really say anything you didn t just read


  3. Lyn Lyn says:

    William Butler Yeats.When I read this name I think of lyric Irish poetry, a Nobel prize and Guinness.Yeats was also a discerning student of Irish fantasy The emerald isle is, to many, synonymous with legends of faeries and folk tales of the unseen world In 1893 Yeats published Celtic Twilight, a collection of essays, sketches, and anecdotes all with imagery and language reminiscent of Ireland s connections to a mystical past Folk art is, indeed, the oldest of the aristocracies of thought William Butler Yeats.When I read this name I think of lyric Irish poetry, a Nobel prize and Guinness.Yeats was also a discerning student of Irish fantasy The emerald isle is, to many, synonymous with legends of faeries and folk tales of the unseen world In 1893 Yeats published Celtic Twilight, a collection of essays, sketches, and anecdotes all with imagery and language reminiscent of Ireland s connections to a mystical past Folk art is, indeed, the oldest of the aristocracies of thought, and because it refuses what is passing and trivial, the merely clever and pretty, as certainly as the vulgar and insincere, and because it has gathered into itself the simplest and most unforgettable thoughts of the generations, it is the soil where all great art is rooted Yeats leads the reader on a tour of his homeland we are introduced to a part of his life and he takes the style of a guide, escorting us in his charming and poetic way on a tour of his island home We hear the language of his people and see through his countrymen s perspective Finally, he ends our visit with a poem Into the Twilight.Out worn heart, in a time out worn, Come clear of the nets of wrong and right Laugh, heart, again in the gray twilight Sigh, heart, again in the dew of the morn Thy mother Eire is always young, Dew ever shining and twilight gray, Though hope fall from thee or love decay Burning in fires of a slanderous tongue Come, heart, where hill is heaped upon hill, For there the mystical brotherhood Of hollow wood and the hilly wood And the changing moon work out their will And God stands winding his lonely horn And Time and World are ever in flight, And love is less kind than the gray twilight, And hope is less dear than the dew of the morn


  4. Leo . Leo . says:

    As a child I was fascinated by words The etymology of words The tones How some words look similar How some words sound similar How wordsspell Faerie and Pharoe I have also over many years had an interest in different cultures and their similarities Particularly the Celtic and Egyptian cultures I have been to Egypt and as a resident of the UK have visited many Celtic sites Over many years I have wondered about the similarities between these two cultures Chariots Pyramids Mysticism As a child I was fascinated by words The etymology of words The tones How some words look similar How some words sound similar How wordsspell Faerie and Pharoe I have also over many years had an interest in different cultures and their similarities Particularly the Celtic and Egyptian cultures I have been to Egypt and as a resident of the UK have visited many Celtic sites Over many years I have wondered about the similarities between these two cultures Chariots Pyramids Mysticism I wonder if Imoteph was actually a Druid The magicians of Egypt practiced black magic Kabbala, numerology, gnosticism They were very enlightened and had great knowledge of the sciences just like the Druids When one spells the word Judaism it sounds familiar to Druidism Also Jew sounds like Dru Was Merlin and Imoteph of the same ilk Elizabeth 1 right hand, Sir John Dee, was himself into the druidic and kabbalistic practices Signed his works with007 Interesting Was a Druids Wand made from Holly Wood Hmmm What was William Blake referring to when he wrote Jerusalem England, the New Juresalem That green and pleasant land Was that before or after the Roman Empire swallowed England BY WILLIAM BLAKEAnd did those feet in ancient timeWalk upon Englands mountains green And was the holy Lamb of God,On Englands pleasant pastures seen And did the Countenance Divine,Shine forth upon our clouded hills And was Jerusalem builded here,Among these dark Satanic Mills Bring me my Bow of burning gold Bring me my arrows of desire Bring me my Spear O clouds unfold Bring me my Chariot of fire I will not cease from Mental Fight,Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand Till we have built Jerusalem,In Englands green pleasant Land


  5. Beth Beth says:

    This is Yeats s collection of stories and lore surrounding Celtic fairies, ghosts and spirits It s available at Librivox.org audio and at Sacred Texts.Most of the chapters are pretty short My favorites are The Hosting of the Sidhe the poem that opens the book , A Teller of Tales Yeats s description of Paddy Flynn, the storyteller who provided him with many of these tales , The Untiring Ones concerning humans who were enchanted by the fairies The Man and His Boots a funny story a This is Yeats s collection of stories and lore surrounding Celtic fairies, ghosts and spirits It s available at Librivox.org audio and at Sacred Texts.Most of the chapters are pretty short My favorites are The Hosting of the Sidhe the poem that opens the book , A Teller of Tales Yeats s description of Paddy Flynn, the storyteller who provided him with many of these tales , The Untiring Ones concerning humans who were enchanted by the fairies The Man and His Boots a funny story about a man whose boots are haunted , and A Remonstrance with Scotsmen for Having Soured the Disposition of Their Ghosts and Faeries That last one is an essay about the Scottish attitude towards fairies and spirits, contrasted with the Irish attitude Yeats writesYou have discovered the faeries to be pagan and wicked You would like to have them all up before the magistrate In Ireland warlike mortals have gone amongst them, and helped them in their battles, and they in turn have taught men great skill with herbs, and permitted some few to hear their tunes Carolan slept upon a faery rath Ever after their tunes ran in his head, and made him the great musician he was In Scotland you have denounced them from the pulpit In Ireland they have been permitted by the priests to consult them on the state of their souls Unhappily the priests have decided that they have no souls, that they will dry up like so much bright vapour at the last day butin sadness than in anger they have said it The Catholic religion likes to keep on good terms with its neighbours


  6. Tifany Tifany says:

    A definite must read for anyone interested in fairy tales, especially the Irish sort, as I ve never found anything better Yeats, of course, should be read for his own sake, anyway, and if you wantYeats, go for MYTHOLOGIES, the version that includes both the Celtic Twilight and Yeats own retellings, in prose, of Irish epic stories, as well as his own original tales There s another Yeats collection of traditional tales Irish Folk and Fairy Stories that also includes the Celtic Twilight, A definite must read for anyone interested in fairy tales, especially the Irish sort, as I ve never found anything better Yeats, of course, should be read for his own sake, anyway, and if you wantYeats, go for MYTHOLOGIES, the version that includes both the Celtic Twilight and Yeats own retellings, in prose, of Irish epic stories, as well as his own original tales There s another Yeats collection of traditional tales Irish Folk and Fairy Stories that also includes the Celtic Twilight, but if you re not sure how much of this you want, and want to start with just the best, start with the Celtic Twilight Yeats has a lovely Chekhovian trick of introducing a new thought, a new branching out of the story, just in the last few lines of many of the pieces, that makes this volume especially numinous and atmospheric Conor McPherson s play, The Weir, is also a good read in this vein, though it has a contemporary setting it has a very Yeatsian feel, in the way it brings the supernatural into the everyday, though it s humor is in a welcome waysly


  7. Maria Maria says:

    This was a slow start but this is the faery that I love Here they are bit good or wholesome, Yeats writes them for the mischievous, ethereal, haunting, fearful, spiteful and vengeful beings that they are Being the first work of Yeats I ve ever read, I was unsure as to what I was getting into but I might just readof his work Took a bit for me to wrap my head towards the writing style as I ve been reading a lot of modern fiction thus the slow speed but I also think that it had to do with Y This was a slow start but this is the faery that I love Here they are bit good or wholesome, Yeats writes them for the mischievous, ethereal, haunting, fearful, spiteful and vengeful beings that they are Being the first work of Yeats I ve ever read, I was unsure as to what I was getting into but I might just readof his work Took a bit for me to wrap my head towards the writing style as I ve been reading a lot of modern fiction thus the slow speed but I also think that it had to do with Yeats writing style


  8. Rodney Rodney says:

    You can have your cones and interpenetrating gyres for me, the unguarded, soppy Romanticism of The Celtic Twilight, based on the diaries the young Yeats kept as he tromped through Irish village life, is the best guide to the obsessions and occult yearnings that animate his poetry, early late The anecdotes and rambling asides capture the poet in his native habitat, head in the clouds and feet in the bog of an Ireland that never quite was, but that he needed to shake off the bluff rationalism You can have your cones and interpenetrating gyres for me, the unguarded, soppy Romanticism of The Celtic Twilight, based on the diaries the young Yeats kept as he tromped through Irish village life, is the best guide to the obsessions and occult yearnings that animate his poetry, early late The anecdotes and rambling asides capture the poet in his native habitat, head in the clouds and feet in the bog of an Ireland that never quite was, but that he needed to shake off the bluff rationalism of his father s generation and put on that questioning, less self assured thing called the Modern


  9. Michael Michael says:

    This has such an evocative title, I ve wanted to read it for decades I d expected it to be a lyrical celebration of the folkloric traditions of Ireland, and those parts of it that were that, I found the best For the rest, it was a collection of brief outlines of fairly typical folkloric tales, interspersed with some slightly longer stories, some of which were interesting A slightly disappointing read, but still worthwhile 3.5 5


  10. XPHAIEA. XPHAIEA. says:

    Yeats believed in faeries My hero These are the tricksy meddlesome faeries of Irish myth and legend, and his book chronicles real life documentation of faery happenings and occurences from Irish locals Yeats was fascinated by the power of myth and how it impacts on everyday life We have here tales of ghosts, faery pigs in the forest, enchanted glades, changelings, the strange creatures of the hedgerows What is fascinating is that these are both fabulous tales and a record of popular beliefs Yeats believed in faeries My hero These are the tricksy meddlesome faeries of Irish myth and legend, and his book chronicles real life documentation of faery happenings and occurences from Irish locals Yeats was fascinated by the power of myth and how it impacts on everyday life We have here tales of ghosts, faery pigs in the forest, enchanted glades, changelings, the strange creatures of the hedgerows What is fascinating is that these are both fabulous tales and a record of popular beliefs in Ireland at the beginning of the 20th century.Yeats was heavily involved in mysticism, and was a member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn magic and the otherwordly permeate his writings and poems, and he has a beautiful and evocative voice I will definitely seek out a hard copy of this.Available on LibriVox and Sacred Texts


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