[PDF] O Remédio By Michelle Lovric – Buyprobolan50.co.uk

O Remédio Numa Noite Inesquec Vel De , Num Famoso Teatro Londrino, A Alquimia Do Amor E Da Morte Funde Subitamente As Vidas De Uma Actriz Veneziana E De Um Aristocrata Ingl S Mas Nenhum Deles Quem Aparenta Ser Ela Uma Espia Ao Servi O De Veneza, Ele, O Maior Charlat O De Londres Segredos Perigosos E Mentiras Elaboradas Cedo Empurram Os Dois Amantes Em Direc Es Opostas, Desesperados Em Saber A Verdade Um Sobre O Outro, Mas Tamb M Sobre Si Pr Prios Um Tempo De Rem Dios Fabulosos Excremento De Pav O E P De Ouro S O Considerados T O Eficazes Quanto Serpentes Esmagadas E Os Amantes Procuram Um B Lsamo Para Aplacar Todas As Doen As, Todas As Feridas Do Amor A Sua Busca Leva Os Das Ruelas Mais Obscuras De Londres Enigm Tica Veneza Uma Dan A Entre Teatros E Bord Is, Botic Rios E Conventos, Onde O Par Pode Ser Um Fidalgo, Um Espi O Ou Um Assassino


About the Author: Michelle Lovric

Michelle Lovric is a novelist, writer and anthologist.Her third novel, The Remedy, was long listed for the 2005 Orange Prize for Fiction The Remedy is a literary murder mystery set against the background of the quack medicine industry in the eighteenth century Her first novel, Carnevale, is the story of the painter Cecilia Cornaro, described by The Times as the possessor of the most covetable life in fiction in 2001 In Lovric s second novel, The Floating Book, a chorus of characters relates the perilous beginning of the print industry in Venice The book explores the translation of raw emotion into saleable merchandise from the points of view of poets, editors, publishers and their lovers The Floating Book, a London Arts award winner, was also selected as a WH Smith Read of the Week Her first novel for young adult readers, The Undrowned Child, is published by Orion The sequel is due in summer 2010.Her fourth adult novel, The Book of Human Skin, is published by Bloomsbury in Spring 2010.Lovric reviews for publications including The Times and writes travel articles about Venice She has featured in several BBC radio documentaries about Venice.She combines her fiction work with editing, designing and producing literary anthologies including her own translations of Latin and Italian poetry Her book Love Letters was a New York Times best seller Lovric divides her time between London and Venice She holds a workshop in her home in London with published writers of poetry and prose, fiction and memoir.



10 thoughts on “O Remédio

  1. says:

    There must be a term for this sub genre of historical fiction which focuses on extensive description of the sordidness and filth of the past the stenches, the sores and sicknesses, the gutters clogged with feces, the pox scarred prostitutes reeking of sweat, jism and tooth decay, the scarred and deformed poor Accompanying this physical description, as if the dirt of the past were a reflection of its moral caliber rather than its lack of sanitation, is what seems an obsession with the forementi There must be a term for this sub genre of historical fiction which focuses on extensive description of the sordidness and filth of the past the stenches, the sores and sicknesses, the gutters clogged with feces, the pox scarred prostitutes reeking of sweat, jism and tooth decay, the scarred and deformed poor Accompanying this physical description, as if the dirt of the past were a reflection of its moral caliber rather than its lack of sanitation, is what seems an obsession with the forementioned prostitution, with the perverted lustful thoughts of every male character, the mindless wantonness of the women because apparently the people of past eras were too ignorant and irrational to concern themselves with pregnancy and disease , with the violent and criminal.I m sure this approach isrealistic than that of, say, historical romance, where the past seems made up largely of balls and the preparations thereof, with faithful servants and the occasional highwayman thrown in for color, but it is still a cripplingly distorted view of societies which were real and complex and for which, in this case, there is plenty of alternative documentation But in any case, my objection to this book is not its obsession with the sordid, which I find unoriginal and not to my taste but may be desired by other readers, but its attention to descriptions of the aforementioned over plot action Dammit, I was promised espionage It took the first hundred pages for any of the main characters to encounter one another, and just when I was raising my hopes that we were finally getting to the action they had sex Without conversation, foreplay, or removal of clothing Then the improbably accented seriously, this was jokingly called Stage Paddy even in the 19th century Valentine goes home This is not the sort of action I was waiting for, Ms Lovric And I m not waiting any longer I have other books to read Books with characters who don t have oozing sores


  2. says:

    I have a love for historical fiction, particularly of the 1700 s, and evenso of Italy I quite enjoyed this book, even though it did make me pull out my dictionary a few times Venice and London are the cities of note in The Remedy , and while it s a love story, it s a twisted one I particularly liked the ending I saw one twist coming about halfway through the book, but the last one eluded me for a while.If you liked In the Company of the Courtesan , you ll probably like this one, to I have a love for historical fiction, particularly of the 1700 s, and evenso of Italy I quite enjoyed this book, even though it did make me pull out my dictionary a few times Venice and London are the cities of note in The Remedy , and while it s a love story, it s a twisted one I particularly liked the ending I saw one twist coming about halfway through the book, but the last one eluded me for a while.If you liked In the Company of the Courtesan , you ll probably like this one, too I enjoyed it Lori AndersonLori Anderson The Store Lori Anderson The Blog Facebook


  3. says:

    If you are a fan of historical fiction and haven t read any of Michelle Lovric s work yet, I totally recommend The Remedy, set in the late 1700s, takes us back and forth between Venice and London and entwines the stories of Venetian actress Mimosina Dolcezza, rogue Valentine Greatrakes and woman child Pevenche Lovric paints a vivid picture of the urban world of the late 1700s, from the theatre to the work of the quacks who sell their remedies to the unsuspecting masses This was a very enjoyab If you are a fan of historical fiction and haven t read any of Michelle Lovric s work yet, I totally recommend The Remedy, set in the late 1700s, takes us back and forth between Venice and London and entwines the stories of Venetian actress Mimosina Dolcezza, rogue Valentine Greatrakes and woman child Pevenche Lovric paints a vivid picture of the urban world of the late 1700s, from the theatre to the work of the quacks who sell their remedies to the unsuspecting masses This was a very enjoyable read


  4. says:

    For having such grandiose language and detailed descriptions, it really didnt have a plot to match It was a little disappointing to have such a trite love story come from such an interesting setting I will say, though, that Lovric does have an amazing vocabulary my favorite epithet a hefty bit of nastiness.


  5. says:

    A historical romance cum drama set in the underbellies of 1780s London and Venice I could finish reading this it s overlong but not poorly paced on the whole, and the prose is often laborious and strangely stilted, but far from unreadable but I don t want to There s little to intrigue, here, despite the richness of the historical setting what opens well with the story of a young recalcitrant nun devolves into an insipid romance, and while there s a hint of conspiracy in the background details A historical romance cum drama set in the underbellies of 1780s London and Venice I could finish reading this it s overlong but not poorly paced on the whole, and the prose is often laborious and strangely stilted, but far from unreadable but I don t want to There s little to intrigue, here, despite the richness of the historical setting what opens well with the story of a young recalcitrant nun devolves into an insipid romance, and while there s a hint of conspiracy in the background details, Lovric does her best to overshadow them with the awkward coupling of two unlikable people In the most mundane and offputting sense, there s a shadow of the grotesque across the book blatant fat shaming, greasy and petty characters, and only the thinnest sort of passion at its heart My appetite is for fantasy of manners style historical drama, richer andintriguing, finding depth in the darkest corners The Remedy manages none of that, and so it s not to my taste and, frankly, I can find nothing else to redeem it It would be a waste of my time to finish reading it, and I don t recommend it


  6. says:

    Whilst it may be true that the mystery is quite easy to predict, I didn t find that it spoiled my enjoyment The recipes for various potions at the beginning of each chapter are fascinating, and the descriptions vividly conjure up images of 18th century London and Venice, in all their festering, stinking glory I didn t expect to like it as much as I did, but it drew me in and kept me riveted right to the end.


  7. says:

    I loved this book, but obviously it s not for everyone Lovric clearly loves words and has a gift for semantics While several reviewers found the book plodding and dull, I was swept away by the author s voice and the plot For me this was fun and fast moving This is my second book from Lovric and I ll be grabbing .


  8. says:

    A fast moving, atmospheric story set in both the seedier parts of 17th century London and the upper echelons of Venetian society Wonderful descriptions of place and character with lots of suspense and uncovered dark secrets, brill


  9. says:

    Where to begin with my review of this book It may end up being just as muddied as the plot line to The Remedy if I m not carefulWhat this is at its very core is a love story A very predictable I correctly guessed the plot twist within the first few chapters , well researched love story set against an interesting historical backdrop What drew me to this book initially was the fact that it was set in 18th century London and dealt with Quack doctors and other unsavory folk It promised an Where to begin with my review of this book It may end up being just as muddied as the plot line to The Remedy if I m not carefulWhat this is at its very core is a love story A very predictable I correctly guessed the plot twist within the first few chapters , well researched love story set against an interesting historical backdrop What drew me to this book initially was the fact that it was set in 18th century London and dealt with Quack doctors and other unsavory folk It promised and delivered unflinching portrayals of what city life during this time was like gritty, sordid, painful, and full of misery, all while wearing a frock coat Lovric has a decided flair for painting grotesque caricaturizations of people and their inner machinations, and her three main characters are no exception each as ugly and twisted and broken as the next, despite the pleasing outward countenances of Mimosina Dolcezza and Valentine Greatrakes, the two great lovers of the book.The ghastly woman child Pevenche was the brightest burning flame in my opinion, her lurid physical description following me around from page to page.The meat of the novel doesn t begin until about 200 pages within, when the plot line unravels and becomes tangled and messy If you are like me, you already know how the book is going to end so just read the novel for the bizarre recipes for healing unguents and nostrums from authentic and somehow still extant 18th century sources which announce the beginning of each new chapter All in all, despite its flaws The Remedy it is an entertaining jaunt which sometimes smacks of Rikki Ducornet probably because of the grotesque descriptions of people and ailments and is recommended for those folks who have an interest in strange historical details and events.Read it for historic details of 18th century Venice and London, unflinching descriptions of various priapic medical disorders I counted the word effluvia five times , sordid ale house interiors, vengeful Italian nuns and strange, historical apocrypha


  10. says:

    The voice of the female main character was spellbinding, and I was sucked into her world right away I was making pancakes while reading, and I usually need to have something interesting to read when cooking It was such a welcome change to read about someone who had been treated unjustly, who had survived traumatizing events and didn t whine or wait to be rescued, but ACTED, acted with spite and malice, but not without humanity and compassion So I liked her and wished her well, even though The voice of the female main character was spellbinding, and I was sucked into her world right away I was making pancakes while reading, and I usually need to have something interesting to read when cooking It was such a welcome change to read about someone who had been treated unjustly, who had survived traumatizing events and didn t whine or wait to be rescued, but ACTED, acted with spite and malice, but not without humanity and compassion So I liked her and wished her well, even though theoretically I shouldn t have, because she was also a privileged, spoiled brat.The male main character was meh I m not against first person present tense narration at all, but it didn t work for me here I guess the choice was made to distinguish the two narrative voices, but the effect was jarring Poor Valentine He did have better moments, but as a whole I thought him a bit too soft, too gullible, too careless for a king of the underworld he was supposed to be I waited for him to show somesophistication, and he never did Like he didn t figure out right away that Mimosina s name was only a stage pseudonym His lovesickness with Mimosina and submissiveness with Pevenche seemed to me out of character Oh, and Pevenche was my second, or possibly even most, favorite character Poor girl had issues, but her personality was made of steel I definitely didn t like the end of her storyline it was just unfair there was something highly unnatural about the whole thing, since the moment when she left London Why would everything go so smoothly Where did they have the money for the whole escapade And why wasn t there any conclusion for let s call it family matters And the end how the hell would Pevenche find out all that The details about the daily life in Venice and London seemed to be well researched the chapters with the quack doctor were probably my favorite I didn t care for the descriptions of various medicines at the beginning of the chapters too precious but they did make me wonder if they were authentic, or if the author made them up.Anyway, it was an intriguing book, despite all my quibbles, and I d like to readof this author


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