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Hesiod and Theognis Hesiod, Who Lived In Boetia In The Late Th Century BCE, Is One Of The Oldest Known Of Greek Poets His Theogony Contains A Systematic Genealogy Of The Gods From The Beginning Of The World An Account Of The Struggles Of The Titans In Contrast, Works Days Is A Compendium Of Moral Practical Advice On Husbandry, Throwing Unique Light On Archaic Greek Society As Well As Offering The Earliest Known Sources For The Myths Of Pandora, Prometheus The Golden Age, His Poetry Provides A Valuable Account Of The Ethics Superstitions Of The Society In Which He Lived Unlike Homer, Hesiod Writes About Himself His Family He Stands Out As The St Personality In European Literature This New Translation, By A Leading Expert On The Hesiodic Poems Combines Accuracy With Readability It S Accompanied By An Introduction Explanatory Notes Theognis Of Megara Fl Th Century BCE Was An Ancient Greek Poet More Than Half Of The Extant Elegiac Poetry Of Greece Before The Alexandrian Period Is Included In The , Verses Ascribed To Theognis


10 thoughts on “Hesiod and Theognis

  1. says:

    Hesiod was considered the equal of Homer by the ancients Although this view is impossible for a modern to hold without being deceitful, there is still much to begrudgingly admire in Hesiod For one, his creation myth is pretty standard for the time period, and so we get a glimpse into typical Greek piety and or a typical Greek state ceremony as, we must remember, all myths are corporate PR campaigns, and the Theogony represents a classic of the genre Homer, we recall, was private, after hours Hesiod was considered the equal of Homer by the ancients Although this view is impossible for a modern to hold without being deceitful, there is still much to begrudgingly admire in Hesiod For one, his creation myth is pretty standard for the time period, and so we get a glimpse into typical Greek piety and or a typical Greek state ceremony as, we must remember, all myths are corporate PR campaigns, and the Theogony represents a classic of the genre Homer, we recall, was private, after hours entertainment for the rich Works and Days, however, is working class conservatism circa the eighth century B.C.E., and, while the mentality displayed is lamentable, it represents in fine poetic form the archetype of the farmer capitalist which, through Cato the Elder and others, became sort of a stereotype in the ancient world Paired with these is Theognis, a conservative dilettante who writes about his conservative political opinions and his paedophilia two things that seem to be psychologically inseparable and so we have the first of the many millions of documented cases Altogether, while these works are not of the highest quality, they remain edifying and essential reading in order to properly take in the Greek experience


  2. says:

    Hesiod s works are classics among classics and will teach you the detailed rules for taking a piss in ancient Greece but Theognis was a big surprise He writes a number of brilliantly whiny and almost hilariously cynical sayings and short pieces, and his voice is really something different than my meager experience with the ancient Greeks thus far I d compare itto Job in the Bible, or possibly even the bleakest classical Chinese poets The obvious inspiration he had on Nietzsche is a Hesiod s works are classics among classics and will teach you the detailed rules for taking a piss in ancient Greece but Theognis was a big surprise He writes a number of brilliantly whiny and almost hilariously cynical sayings and short pieces, and his voice is really something different than my meager experience with the ancient Greeks thus far I d compare itto Job in the Bible, or possibly even the bleakest classical Chinese poets The obvious inspiration he had on Nietzsche is also only too clear His alien place in the context of Greek poets seems to be exactly how he would have wanted it, given the many isolationist and antagonistic sentiments like this one from lines 415 418 Searching, I ve found no comrade like myself,A faithful friend, in whom there s no deceit.Put to the test, like gold beside mere lead,I will be found superior every time


  3. says:

    It seems that Hesiod was appreciated by Alexandrian critics over Homer for his peaceful tone in Works and Days The didactic tone in Works and Days and many mythical aspects seem to be influenced by Near East Mesopotamia, Hebrew prophets according to Martin Litchfield West and many others Below I comment on the similarity between the poem and Islam Abrahamic religion that descended from Hebrew and Christianity , I wrote it mostly in Arabic for quoting from Quran and Muhammad s pbuh teachin It seems that Hesiod was appreciated by Alexandrian critics over Homer for his peaceful tone in Works and Days The didactic tone in Works and Days and many mythical aspects seem to be influenced by Near East Mesopotamia, Hebrew prophets according to Martin Litchfield West and many others Below I comment on the similarity between the poem and Islam Abrahamic religion that descended from Hebrew and Christianity , I wrote it mostly in Arabic for quoting from Quran and Muhammad s pbuh teachings Theogony 2 stars The poem is amateur quality, he is nothing compared to Homer Yet it is an important work for Myth historical origin and gods Genealogy I wonder what the poet s sources for these details are, did he receive them from the Muses, and thus he is technically a prophet Did the Greeks have prophets in the Abrahamic religions sense where they come with holy books and anyone who differs from them is a heretic The poem is so hard to follow and didn t make sense, and really random and all over.This is the only poetic part of the poem Then Pallas slept with Ocean s daughter, Styx Who bore him shapely ankled Victory And Glory, in his house, and famous sons Power and Force They have no house apart From Zeus, nor any seat, nor any path Except where God commands them, and they sit Forever at the side of thundering Zeus Works and Days 5 stars They say the poet is either another Hesiod than Theogony s Hesiod, or that he is the same but matured This poem is naive, in the good sense Picture yourself in the countryside, lying on the field under the summer s sun, poor and heavy on debt because of your continuous bad judgment, your older farmer brother sharing you his trivial wisdom in life and work farming.After calling of muses, the poem starts thus notice how poetic this is, unlike Theogony Strife is no only child Upon the earth Two Strifes exist the one is praised by those Who come to know her, and the other blamed Their natures differ for the cruel one Makes battles thrive, and war she wins no love But men are forced, by the immortals will, To pay the grievous goddess due respect The other, first born child of blackest Night, Was set by Zeus, who lives in air, on high, Set in the roots of earth, an aid to men She urges even lazy men to work A man grows eager, seeing another rich From ploughing, planting, ordering his house So neighbor vies with neighbor in the rush For wealth this Strife is good for mortal men Potter hates potter, carpenters compete, And beggar strives with beggar, bard with bard O Perses Hesiod s younger brother , store this in your heart do not Let Wicked Strife persuade you, skipping work, To gape at politicians and give eat To all the quarrels of the market place He has no time for courts and public life Who has not stored up one full year s supply Of corn, Demeter s gift, got from the earth When you have grain piled high, you may dispute And fight about the goods of other men But you will never get this chance again Come, let us settle our dispute at once, And let our judge be Zeus, whose laws are just We split our property in half, but you Grabbed at the larger part and praised to heaven The lords who love to try a case like that, Eaters of bribes The fool They do not know That half may be worthfar than whole, Nor how much profit lies in poor man s bread The poem also has Myth, how Pandora came to being, the story flows smoothly and is not rigid like those in Theogony.He speaks of many mortal races before humans, and he tells that one day even this race will end Zeus will destroy this race of mortal men When babies shall be born with grey hair But there are some who till the fields of pride And work at evil deeds Zeus marks them out, And often, all the city suffers for Their wicked schemes, and on these men, from heaven The son of Kronos sends great punishments, Both plaque and famine, and the people die Their wives are barren, and their villages Dwindle, according to the plan of Zeus The deathless gods are never far away They mark the crooked judges who grind down Their fellow men and do not fear the gods Three times ten thousand watchers over men, Immortal, roam the fertile earth for Zeus Clothed in a mist, they visit every land And keep a watch on law suits and on crimes He who harms a guest or suppliant, or acts Unseemly, sleeping with his brother s wife, Or in his folly, hurts an orphan child, Or he who picks rough quarrels, and attacks His father at the threshold of old age, He angers Zeus himself, and in the end He pays harsh penalties for all his sinsIt is a curse to have a worthless neighbor equally, A good one is a blessing he who is So blest possesses something of a great worth No cow of yours will stray away if you Have watchful neighbors Measure carefully When you must borrow from your neighbor, then, Pay back the same, or , if possible, And you will have a friend in time of need Let wages promised to a friend be fixed Beforehand even with your brother, smile And have a witness, for too much mistrust And too much trust can both be ruinous Don t let a woman, wiggling her behind, And flattering and coaxing, you in She wants your barn woman is just a cheat Hahahahahaha gold diggers An only son preserves his father s name And keeps the fortune growing in one house If you have two, you ll need to havewealth And live a longer time But Zeus can find Ways to enrich a larger family More children meanhelp and greater gainsIf you proceed as I have described, your corn will nod and bow With fatness, to the ground I never thought corn farming can get this poetic The animals Shudder, with tails between their legs they find No help in furry hides, the cold goes through Even the shaggy breasted He Boreas, god of winter does not pierce the soft skinned girl who stays Indoors at home with mother, innocent Of golden Aphrodite s works She bathes Her tender skin, anoints herself with oil, And going to an inner room at home, She takes a nap upon a winter day, When, in his fireless house and dismal place The Boneless One the octopus is gnawing on his foot For him, the sun no longer lights the way To better feeding grounds the sun has gone To make his circuit with the dark skinned men Ethiopians or Egyptians He shines upon the Greeks a shorter time The horned and hornless creatures of the wood In pain, with chattering teeth, flee through the brush, On care in all their minds, to find a cave Or thickly covered shelter Like the man, Three legged with his staff, with shattered spine, Whose head looks to the ground, like him they go Wandering, looking for shelter from the snow Wow, this paragraph took the poem to another level The soft skinned girl scene is so charming and warm, though it s consistent with Hesiod contempt for women and their carefree workless lives Then he takes out of the village finally and the world out there, octopus in the sea chewing his own arms out of hunger, wild animals in the wild looking for shelter, this dramatizes Winter beautifully He tops that with his allegory of the helpless three legged head down old man, this is Homer quality If you should turn your foolish mind to trade, Longing to flee from debts and painful want, I ll teach the measures of the sounding sea, Unlearned though I am in sea faring And ship For I have sailed upon the sea Just to Euboea, once, from Aulis, where There gathered the Achaians, long ago, From holy Hellas, waiting the storm, So they might sail with many men to Troy, Ah, if he only specified how many years earlier the Trojan War broke. Bring home a wife when you are ripe for it When you are thirty, not muchnor less, That is the proper age for marrying And your wife should have matured four years before, And marry in the fifth year She should be A virgin you must teach her sober ways Particularly good is one who lives Nearby, but look around you carefully, Lest all neighbors chuckle at your choice A prize is no better than a worthy wife A bad one makes you shiver with the cold The greedy wife will roast her man alive Without the aid of fire, and though he is Quite tough, she ll bring him to a raw old age Never omit to wash your hands before You pour to Zeus and to the other gods The morning offering of sparkling wine They will not hear your prayers, but spit them back Don t leave a house half built, for then a crow Croaking, might sit on it, and caw bad luckNor should a man use water for his bath With which a woman bathed herself before The punishment is awful, for a time Even if she was Scarlett Johansson You are no fun, Hesiod At the end on the poem he talks about the days in month, how lucky a man and at the same time how unlucky a woman can be to be born in the 21st day, the twelfth is better for the labouring mules, and so on Is this a primitive days based vs month based Horoscope system Theognis Elegies 3.5 stars .Theognis sure uses metaphorsthan Hesiod, but Hesiod is better in quality The wise old aristocratic man teaching is similar to Works and Days without the farming of course , yet it is not similar, I can t pinpoint why This anthological work it s compiled this way since ancient times is a collection of short poems mostly 2 to 7 lines on wine, human nature, war and politics, love, and trivial wisdom The translator provides very helpful footnotes She also took liberty in translating, but she also provides a literal translation in the footnotes, so we get the best of both worlds Here is an example of musical rhyming lines that she took liberty in translating He won t refuse a commoner If lots of money goes with her And vulgar oafs with brutish ways Can marry noble girls, these days I don t please all men of Megara So what not even Zeus is praised by all, Whether he holds his rain or lets it fall I ll blame no enemy who s honorable Nor praise a friend who acts in a low way The city s pregnant, Kurnos, and I fear She ll bear a violent leader of civil war He tells his boy lover common in Ancient Greek that he made him famous for all people with his poems and that even in death, people will still lip his name All for what The boy lover cheated and lied to him, he is heartbroken now The heaviest burden for a talky man Is silence everywhere he goes he talks And is a bore, disliked by all To sit With him at dinner is like being jailed Hahahaha tell me about it The bad did not spring evil from the womb Rather, in company with evil men Ah Poverty, you slut Why do you stay Why love me when I hate you Please betray Me for another man, and be his wife Why must you always share my wretched life I am surprised at you, dear Zeus You re lord Everywhere, hold all honor and great power You know the mind and heart of every man Your rule is supreme, my king, in all the world How then, O son of Kronos, can your mind Bear to see criminals and honest men Both thoughtful men whose minds are moderate, And sinful weaklings share the same fate No divine rules are fixed for men, no road To travel which will surly please the gods Good ol why bad things happen to good people A young wife is no prize for an old man She s like a ship whose rudder does not work Her anchors never hold At night she breaks Her moorings, and drifts to another port Dam youth damn miserable age The one For coming, and the other, for leaving me Slave heads don t ever stand up straight, they grow Tipped down in servitude, their necks bent low No rose or hyacinth comes from the wild Squill, nor does a slave bear a free child Insert Founding Fathers freedom quotes Reputation s an evil, trial is best Many have good repute that are untried Do good and you ll receive it Why send out Announcements News of good work travels fast Don t ever swear, That thing will never be The gods might take offense, and they have power Over the end For good may come from bad And bad from good The criminal, who acts intentionally And disregards the gods, would pay, himself, The penalty for crime not that the sins Of fathers should bring sorrow to their sons In later days The evil father s sons Who practice justice, son of Kronos, they Who fear your anger, loving from the first The right among fellow citizens, Should not be punished for their father s crimes I wish the gods agreed But as things are, Bad men escape, and others bear the brunt And this, king of the gods how is it just That he who keeps himself from unjust acts And never violates a law or oath, This just man finds no justice from the gods What other mortal, looking on this man, Learns honor for the gods How should he feel Seeing the wicked, reckless man who has No fear of god or man, glutted with gold Won violently, while honorable men Wear out their lives in wretched poverty An ox stamps hard with his foot upon my tongue, And I can t babble, even though I know Proverbial for forced silence, as noted by the translator, how poetic Stamp on the empty headed people Jab With your pointed goad, and lay the heavy yoke Around their necks You won t find, under the sun, A people who love slavery so much May Peace and Wealth prevail, so I can feast With friends I m not in love with evil war So unhomeric If Zeus took mortal actions seriously, Since he knows the inward thoughts of every man And all the deeds of just and unjust men It would be devastating for mankindNot if they put Mount Tmolus on my head Would I bow my neck to my enemies heavy yoke When he s young, a man can sleep the whole night long With a friend of his own age, and have his fill Of making love, and he can join the flute And sing, and go to parties Nothing else Is so delightful to a boy or girl What do I care for honor or for wealth Pleasure and happiness beat everything Don t lay me out, when I m dead, on a royal couch, I d like some good things while I m still alive Boughs are as good as carpets for a corpse To lie on wood s not hard or soft to him You re like a horse, boy, who has had his fill Of barley elsewhere, then comes back to me, Wanting a gentle rider, a cool spring, Soft meadows to run in, and some shady woods In other words, who s your daddy That man is never happy who does not Love dogs and smooth hooved horses and young men My boy, you re just like a wandering water bird Flying now here, now there, in search of love You re lovely to look at, boy, but on your head There lies a heavy crown of silliness You re like a kite, you wheel around so fast Persuaded by the words of other men I once thought you, of all my friends, could be Faithful, but now you love another man I, who did well by you, am tossed aside I hope men see, and quit the love of boys Quit love of boys They can t think of quitting marriage, so is boy loving for these aristocrats just a kind of entertainment As long as your cheek s so smooth, my boy, I won t Stop kissing you, you wouldn t even stop If the punishment for doing so were death The love of boys is sweet Even the king Of gods, the son of Kronos, loved a boy Ganymede, and he took him to his home Olympus, and he gave divinity To him, because he had the lovely bloom Of youth Don t be surprised, Simonides, To see me love and serve a handsome boy


  4. says:

    Not the translation I needed for my Ancient Greek course but a great translation just the same I love Hesiod s Theogony His Works and Days is also included in this volume and while not as superior as the Theogony, is still a delight to read These are followed by Theognis Elegies, which is mainly focused on the changes in the Greek society of the day and was written approximately 200 years after Hesiod s works Theogony charts the Greek Creation myths, about the beginning of the reign of Not the translation I needed for my Ancient Greek course but a great translation just the same I love Hesiod s Theogony His Works and Days is also included in this volume and while not as superior as the Theogony, is still a delight to read These are followed by Theognis Elegies, which is mainly focused on the changes in the Greek society of the day and was written approximately 200 years after Hesiod s works Theogony charts the Greek Creation myths, about the beginning of the reign of almighty Zeus and the violent yet entertaining stories of how the other gods, Titans and mortals came to be The course I am doing is about the philosophical nature of the epic poem Although I didn t like the introduction to this edition, written by Dorothea Wender, I found the Notes section at the back to be helpful and informative Three stars for Wender s translation with an extra star for Hesiod s drama telling abilities


  5. says:

    This would average to a 2.5 overall.Although Hesiod was given a similar status to Homer in Greek society, it seems pretty clear that they are not really on the same level, whichever of the two poems of either you compare At first, confusingly, I thought the introduction was trying to claim that the Theogony and Works and Days were written by two different people which is entirely plausible, and the introduction does at least bring this up and discuss it , hence the dual authorship in the title This would average to a 2.5 overall.Although Hesiod was given a similar status to Homer in Greek society, it seems pretty clear that they are not really on the same level, whichever of the two poems of either you compare At first, confusingly, I thought the introduction was trying to claim that the Theogony and Works and Days were written by two different people which is entirely plausible, and the introduction does at least bring this up and discuss it , hence the dual authorship in the title, but instead they ve included a lesser known work, Theognis Elegies, in this edition I m not sure why the decision was made to pair Hesiod and Theognis together like this, but I m at least glad to have read them both now, albeit for very different reasonsTheogonyI considered giving this three stars, but it was reallyof a 2 As the title might suggest, this poem concerns the creation of the universe and how the theological Greek canon of gods as we know it came to be In the introduction The Theogony was such a strain to translate I kept having to check an impulse to improve it a little, on nearly every page It was wonderful, exciting material but the writer had managed to make so much of it tedious This didn t exactly give me high hopes for reading the text itself, but I found some value in it nonetheless It is obviously impressive to see so many different aspects of Greek mythology drawn together for an origin story, and the absence of mankind is an interesting detail, and may suggest that we are not, in fact, front and centre in existence, and the poem and general Greek mentality seems to attest to this as well.I would agree with the introduction that it has a skewed sense of proportion dramatic episodes given too little weight andminor details too much , but for me the mediocre style didn t tarnish the content enough to detract from my enjoyment, whereas in the Works and Days the style wasn t enough to make up for it I might feel differently reading them in Greek, but in English the divide is not that wide for me Since the Greeks had no real definitive holy book a text like this might give some idea of where they were actually getting their mythological canon from outside of the less definitive folklore passed down, but in terms of its actual merits as a piece of poetry it is nothing particularly specialWorks and DaysThis poem isof a didactic type, and like a lot of didactic poetry attempts to take a mundane subject in this case, farming and moral instruction and use poetic skill to make it seem fit for artistic focus, even when it really isn t In contrast to the Theogony, The Works and Days was a pleasure to work on, and full of surprises And this was the poem I had dreaded, expecting dull moralizing and a farmer s almanac Perhaps the writing isfluent in this work, but that was not enough to make up for the dismal subject matter and extremely annoying authorial tone to be fair, there are other ancient works that are well written with plain subject matter that are very valuable, but I don t find this to be one of them because I don t think the writing makes up for the content here Obviously, I don t agree with the translator It seems like its main value is as a historical and cultural curiosity, and not really worth reading aside from that.The style, as the translator promised, is fairly good, and admittedly better than the Theogony but was not anything particularly special in the end and the text could not save itself on this merit alone and I do wish the translator wouldn t try and make the verses rhyme since this sometimes lends to meandering away from the accuracy of the translation, and at least for me doesn t increase enjoyment of the verse in English It baffles me that people have ever felt it appropriate to compare Hesiod with Homer.Also, misogyny kills Seriously, I can t be expected to like a work in which this comes across quite as strongly as it does here, because who could possibly enjoy having abuse hurled at them and their kind view spoiler You wouldn t expect a black person to enjoy Heart of Darkness hide spoiler The Theogony has misogyny as well, but it is for the most part confined to one myth and at least the goddesses are portrayed favourably, which seems a bit like cognitive dissonance to me since they are surely female as well whereas here the prejudice seems to permeate much of the verse I might have given this two stars since the farming advice is at least somewhat interesting and new to me, but I have no qualms about bringing it down to a 1.5 for this reason alone Theognis Elegies Usually when a lesser known work or author is tagged onto afamous one, the content seems pretty underwhelming especially by comparison to the major work , but here I had the opposite experience I was disappointed by my experience with Hesiod, but Theognis whom I have studied in the past, but only very briefly and only a few verses of his far exceeded my expectations and seemed even better by comparison to the former.To some, as the translator said, Theognis may come across as unpleasant and self important, but personally I found myself a lotsympathetic towards him than she seemed to be I enjoyed his misanthropy I ll take misanthropy over misogyny any time and his general mistrust of other people, and felt I could connect with how jaded he was in a way that is unusual for me to feel with ancient writers It very much enlivened the reading experience and has made him stand out to me from thebanal subject matter of some other ancient poets.At first the elegies only held my interest somewhat and I didn t find them particularly special, but as I gotinto them I found myself connecting with Theognis mentality and social concernsandIf anything, it seems like Hesiod isn t really for me, and Theognis was the saving grace of this collection I hope I have the chance to study him indepth in the future


  6. says:

    It s good to finally have read Hesiod, even if only in translation He definitely is farsupportive of Zeus than Homer is Strangely enough, I was reading this while also reading Samuel Butler s Homer that s not too strange, I suppose and also while playing through the God of War series again three quite different perspectives on the gods all at the same time made for an interesting week Theognis was all right, but aside from some interesting couplets here and there, it mostly boils dow It s good to finally have read Hesiod, even if only in translation He definitely is farsupportive of Zeus than Homer is Strangely enough, I was reading this while also reading Samuel Butler s Homer that s not too strange, I suppose and also while playing through the God of War series again three quite different perspectives on the gods all at the same time made for an interesting week Theognis was all right, but aside from some interesting couplets here and there, it mostly boils down to a petulant old guy tired of young Grecians playing on his lawn, pretty much Nothing is really gained from him about the classical Greek mind other than the classical Greek mind gets petulant and repetitive in old age, so nothing new about human nature there Putting these two together makes for a nice affordable look at the ancient Greek world, so it s definitely worth the read at least once The editor of the Penguin edition , though, tends to intrude a few times, certainlythan necessary As interesting as it is to know her favorite Theognis elegies, why does she translate her favorites into sonnet like things, warping the content and tone almost completely Fortunately she gives usliteral prose translations in the endnotes when she does this, but it s still a bit confusing Similarly, her argument for why there must be two Hesiods is unconvincing because Words and Days comes after Theogony, and because the style is better, clearly the same person couldn t have written both Are poets not allowed to improve in the ancient world Are they only allowed to get worse assuming the Iliad came before the Odyssey and Antigone came before Oedipus at Colonus Are Shakespeare s early plays better than his middle late plays Strange, really, but get past the intrusive editorialship and read Hesiod for yourself yes, Works and Days is better than Theogony, which shouldn t be surprising to you even though it is surprising to the editor, since learning how to live the quality human life isimportant and interesting even to the classicist than Hesiod s version of the origin of the divine and semi divine pantheon of Ancient Greece before Kratos killed all of them single handedly and even stick around for Theognis, especially if you want a first hand account of the tribulations of being in love with young Grecian boys such a fickle lot, apparently


  7. says:

    Classicist Dorothea Wender s translation of Hesiod is spectacular Even while she says his Theogony is a bit boring and not written in the wonderful style of Works and Days , I think her talent as a translator makes this piece on a creation myth shine Now, I m a huge fan of mythology and the origins of various beings, so I would have liked the Theogony no matter what But, Wender used her skill to make it enjoyable and not simply a seemingly unending onslaught of names When she turns her ey Classicist Dorothea Wender s translation of Hesiod is spectacular Even while she says his Theogony is a bit boring and not written in the wonderful style of Works and Days , I think her talent as a translator makes this piece on a creation myth shine Now, I m a huge fan of mythology and the origins of various beings, so I would have liked the Theogony no matter what But, Wender used her skill to make it enjoyable and not simply a seemingly unending onslaught of names When she turns her eye to Hesiod s Works and Days, she is magnificent Just reading the first stanza, I can immediately tell that this is a much stronger piece of poetry, as Wender stated in her introduction Hesiod stressed the need to be prepared and work hard I enjoyed his description of the five ages of man Golden, Silver, Bronze, the demi gods, and Iron us The demi gods were the race of heroes who have great epics and stories written about them, including those who fought in the Trojan War.Hesiod offers advice and guidance throughout He sagely writes But he who neither thinks himself nor learns From others, is a failure as a man p 68, lines 96 97 Valid then, evenvalid in our present times His advice on farming is tied to astronomy, so that one can tell when to plant, harvest, etc based on which planets and constellations are rising or setting, visible or not, in the sky He tells sailors when to avoid voyages, saying Gales of all winds rage when the Pleiades, Pursued by violent Orion, plunge Into the clouded sea p 78, lines 619 621 He marries my love of astronomy and mythology with tidbits like this.Turning to Theognis, I could have done without him I didn t like what he had to say, and it had nothing to do with the translation To quote from Wender s introduction to his Elegies, Unfortunately, as his personality is revealed in the poems, Theognis is not at all likeable He seems to have been a savage, paranoid, bigoted, bitter, narrow, pompous, self pitying person p 92 I cannot help but agree with her.Wender s notes were wonderful and illuminating I know she probably upset some stodgy white male classicists sitting in their cloistered rooms with her tone, but her skill and passion as a translator brought life to these words without changing the meaning of the original text I enjoyed reading her comments, alternate translations and understandings about the text.Overall, I d give the Hesiod a 5, the content not the translation of Theognis s Elegies a 1, the Notes a 5 and to Dorothea Wender, a 5 Well done and well worth my time


  8. says:

    A miscellany of writings and fragments from the 8th and 6th centuries BCE These pieces are of mixed quality, some quite poetic and others quite prosaic They seem in part to include writings by other authors Solon Worth reading for curiosity value.


  9. says:

    Good introduction and translation, works of fairly significant historical importance, enjoyment in erading them is marginal


  10. says:

    I d already read Hesiod, at least Works Days and the Theogony, but not Theognis and certainly not this translation The reading was done in Springfield, Vermont, the book provided by my host I d already read Hesiod, at least Works Days and the Theogony, but not Theognis and certainly not this translation The reading was done in Springfield, Vermont, the book provided by my host


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