The Jewel That Was Ours MOBI ¸ The Jewel eBook


    The Jewel That Was Ours MOBI ¸ The Jewel eBook a real murder convince him otherwise It is a delight to watch this brilliant, quirky man Morse deduce MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE."/>
  • Paperback
  • 241 pages
  • The Jewel That Was Ours
  • Colin Dexter
  • English
  • 14 February 2018
  • 0804109818

10 thoughts on “The Jewel That Was Ours

  1. James Thane James Thane says:

    When a group of wealthy Americans appears in Oxford on a guided tour, one of the women in the tour is on a special mission A rare and historically valuable jewel had come into the possession of her late husband It was his wish that that the jewel be donated to a museum in Oxford and, in the company of her new husband, the woman has carried the jewel to Great Britain to deliver it herself However, the night before she is to donate the gift, she dies of an apparent heart attack and her purse co When a group of wealthy Americans appears in Oxford on a guided tour, one of the women in the tour is on a special mission A rare and historically valuable jewel had come into the possession of her late husband It was his wish that that the jewel be donated to a museum in Oxford and, in the company of her new husband, the woman has carried the jewel to Great Britain to deliver it herself However, the night before she is to donate the gift, she dies of an apparent heart attack and her purse containing the jewel is stolen.This would hardly seem to merit the attention of Chief Inspector Morse after all, there is no homicide involved and he s not about to waste his time investigating a simple theft But after determining that the lady did, indeed, die of natural causes, Morse can t help but think that something very odd is going on here.When another person associated with the tour is found dead, it clearly is a homicide and Morse and his faithful sergeant, Lewis, are on the job As is always the case when Morse confronts a killing, the puzzle is very complex and it s going to take a very keen mind to sort this one out But, of course, as readers of this series know full well, Morse has exactly that sort of mind, and, as always, it s fun to watch him sort through the issues and the characters involved until he s satisfied that things have properly fallen into place.This is another of those intricate English mysteries that could never occur in real life But it s entertaining to suspend disbelief and watch Morse work his magic once again This is a book that will appeal to lots of those who love traditional British mysteries


  2. Bionic Jean Bionic Jean says:

    A unique episode in theInspector Morsecanon The Jewel That Was Ours started out as an episode for television written by Julian Mitchell, entitledThe Wolvercote Tongue Inspector Morsewas a very popular TV series starring John Thaw as Morse and Kevin Whately as Lewis, who by the time of this episode were both well established in their character rolesThe Wolvercote Tonguewent to air in season 2 on 25th December 1987, and was only developed into a novel, his ninth in theInspector M A unique episode in theInspector Morsecanon The Jewel That Was Ours started out as an episode for television written by Julian Mitchell, entitledThe Wolvercote Tongue Inspector Morsewas a very popular TV series starring John Thaw as Morse and Kevin Whately as Lewis, who by the time of this episode were both well established in their character rolesThe Wolvercote Tonguewent to air in season 2 on 25th December 1987, and was only developed into a novel, his ninth in theInspector Morseseries, by Colin Dexter in 1991.Writers, especially of detective fiction, often say that when a well loved character is portrayed on television, the visual image of the actor, their familiar mannerisms and way the character is depicted then feed into subsequent books which they might write But it must be a rare case where not only the actors versions are well established enough in the public s mind to influence the author, but an actual plot too It is not clear who had the idea initially, but it says a lot for the skill of Julian Mitchell, who wrote and adapted several episodes in the TV series, that he should have captured the feel of the novels so well that Colin Dexter paid him the compliment of developing the idea in this way The endings of the two stories, though, are quite different It has to be said that the first third of the novel falls a little flat, especially coming straight on the heels of the excellentThe Wench is Deadwhich had won a gold dagger award It starts with three hosts who are preparing to welcome an exclusive tour group of Americans to the elegant Randolph Hotel in Oxford Sheila Williams is a liaison and event organiser for the university She has been having an affair with another of the organisers, Dr Theodore Kemp, who is the curator of the Ashmolean Museum We enter the story at the point where it looks as if Kemp has broken this off The third host is the tour s leader, John Ashendon Among the tourists in the exclusive party are Eddie Stratton and his wife, Laura, Phil Aldrich, Janet Roscoe, a vociferous and opinionated woman, Howard and Shirley Brown, Sam and Vera Kronquist and Nancy Wiseman The first part of the novel revolves around the death of Laura Stratton, who is found dead in her room at the Randolph Hotel, shortly after the group has arrived Her handbag, in which she has been keeping the Wolvercote Tongue, has been stolen The Wolvercote Tongue forms part of a jewelled Saxon belt buckle, and Laura had been intending to donate it to the Ashmolean museum during the tour, thereby fulfilling her late husband s wishes Her first husband had been fairly wealthy, amiddle bracket philanthropistwho had willed much of his precious collection to museums The high point of the group s tour of Oxford was to be Laura Stratton s presentation of the Wolvercote Tongue, which obviously now had to be cancelled In the meantime Inspector Morse and Sergeant Lewis investigate the theft as rifts, rivalries and resentments reveal themselves between the organisers.In part two of the book, view spoiler only a couple of days later, a battered and naked corpse is dragged from the River Cherwell This proves to be the body of the Ashmolean s expert on the Wolvercote Tongue, Theodore Kemp Morse had already had his suspicions about the death of Laura Stratton Now he is sure there is a connection with the theft of the Wolvercote Tongue, as Kemp had made strenuous attempts to locate the Wolvercote Tongue after its rediscovery and disappearance in 1873 He had finally tracked it down to its American owner It seemed far too much of a coincidence for Kemp to die at the point when he would finally be able to lay his hands on it Morse and Lewis therefore turn their attentions to investigating both cases as suspicious deaths, despite the pathologist s insistence that Laura Stratton died of natural causes hide spoiler The banter between Morse and the pathologist Max is a joy to read The reader gets a sense that both men are committed professionals in their own field, and equally disparaging of the foolish ambition of the younger pathologist who had originally been assigned to the case They are comfortable in their curmudgeonly companionship, pretending to disparage the other s work at every opportunity, and competing for excellence, although they function in different spheres In fact, of course, they secretly have a high mutual regard for each other, and since we are also aware of this, the sections involving both Max and Morse prove very entertaining.This is also true of the dynamics of how Morse and Lewis relate to each other Dexter shows their dependence on one another on many occasions Morse makes the deductions that lead to the real solution of the case, but Lewis, through his dogged persistence, gets some important evidence They work as a very effective team as they conduct interviews with all the key figures, track down leads, and follow the investigation We see how much Morse relies on Lewis As Morse says,We ve seldom had so many clues, have we But I can t help feeling we ve missed out all the really vital onesYet again we witness how inspired and brilliant Morse is, through Lewis s admiration, when he,wondered about what was going on in Morse s mind at that moment the reading of the clues, those clues to which no one else could see the answers those glimpses of motive that no one else could ever have suspected those answers to the sort of questions that no one else had even begun to ask but we can also see Morse s flaws Yet again, Morse soon finds himself very much attracted to one of the people he is investigating the slightly boozy and blowsy Sheila Williams In this case it is a little different, as his feelings are reciprocated At first, he resists her very blatant invitation, but clearly feels a conflict between his feelings for her and his sense of duty to investigate her as a murder suspect This is a very human side to Morse s character, which is becoming increasingly evident in the novels We also observe Morse s surge of jealousy and disappointment in the final scene of the novel, when he sees Sheila openly flirting with another man Yet women are still continually attracted to him One minor female character observes with approval,the man spokelike a don than a detectiveIt has to be said however, that this does conflict somewhat with the coarse style of flirting Morse indulges in with Sheila Williams in the taxi, which would bein keeping with a different kind of personality We are repeatedly told that Lewis gets a kick out of working alongside Morse, admiring his intellectual prowess despite all his personality flaws,That was one of the big things he admired most about the man, that ability to leap ahead of the field almost from the starting stalls albeit occasionally finding himself on completely the wrong race course Morse appeared to believe that Lewis could sometimes spot something in the stretches ahead that Morse himself had missed It was ridiculous of course It is almost par for the course now that Morse follows a line of reasoning that leads him to the wrong conclusion He is so convinced that he has identified the killer that will not listen to the suspect s protestations of innocence to the great surprise of the new WPC who is taking notes It is Lewis who phones him with the conclusive evidence that Morse s theory is wrong, and Lewis who is given credit by Morse at the end, when Morse has all his suspects gathered together to tell them and his readers the explanation For collectors of Morse trivia, the author says Morse is 55 years old in this novel, and it is clear at one point that he has been heavily involved in betting on the horses when he was younger, and since he is now vehemently opposed to the activity, the reader supposes it did not end well We also learn that Lewis did a fair amount of boxing in his younger days, and was quite good at it view spoiler Delving into the possible motives for Kemp s murder reveals that almost everybody had either a good motive, or was hiding secrets of one kind or another Theodore Kemp s wife, Marion, is in a wheelchair as a result of a car accident for which her husband was to blame The other driver, a young woman, Phillipa Janet Mayo, was killed in the same accident Theo also has many affairs with other women not only Sheila Williams, but also Cedric Downes s wife, Lucy This means that all those involved are suspects, which is fair enough, but when most of the tour party also seem to have long held secrets in two cases dating back to the 1940 s it becomes difficult to suspend disbelief As Morse observes, there is a,strange assortment of extra mural activities from viewing steam locomotives to tracing lost offspring Red herrings, allAnd that is not counting the duplicity of one suspect who finally admitted to watching sex videos in with others in a private flat, when he had claimed to be watching a race hide spoiler Every character on the tour seems to be not only hiding something, but to have a secret ulterior motive for being on the tour, rather than mere literary interest This part of the story demands rather too much credibility on the part of the reader Morse and Lewis slowly unravel the tissue of lies, deceptions and faked alibis and finally uncover a complex plot view spoiler of revenge The main thrust is to do with the fatality in the car crash which crippled his wife so many years ago, and the avenging relatives who are not who they appear to be Interwoven into this is another tale There was to be a sting , where the theft of the Wolvercote Tongue was planned as an insurance fraud, and was not a theft at all This part was further complicated by the accidental death of one of the participants, and the overhearing of the plan by others who then became involved themselves hide spoiler As the novel progresses we do find that some of the characters becomefleshed out and believable One relationship was not as it seemed, and at least one character was acting a part, and was not theperpetually belly aching little lady from California she appeared to be.The creative explanation of this jigsaw puzzle in the final third of the book is the most fascinating part of the story The original title ofThe Wolvercote Tongue had seemed thedistinctive of the two, but by the end of the book it is clear that The Jewel That Was Ours is far better There is the first, obvious reference, to the Wolvercote Tongue Then there is another, very poignant one And right at the end of the book, a third meaning, a secret known to only one character, which is sneakily slipped in by the author Colin Dexter often seems to like to do this, either an ambiguity to tease the reader, or a final little twist, or here as a kind of triple entendre It is one of the stylistic touches of this series, such as the apt literary quotation which each chapter is headed by The chapters are then grouped into three or four parts comprising the entire novel.So by the end of the book, this novel has redeemed itself, offering us a satisfying intellectual puzzle to solve As is often the case in Inspector Morse novels, trivial conversations, misheard words and seemingly insignificant facts turn out to be very important Characters turn out to beinteresting than they had at first appeared, a fewtidbits are revealed in the back story and always intriguing is the continuing developing interaction between Morse and Lewis The best compliment is probably to say that as the story progresses it does take on a life of its own, and the reader forgets that it has been rewritten from a television episode, because it has metamorphosed into something else, something different and satisfying on its own terms


  3. Bettie Bettie says:

    Read by Michael PenningtonTotal Runtime 7 hours 8 minsBodleian Library, OxfordDescription He looked overweight around the midriff, though nowhere else, and she wondered whether perhaps he drank too much He looked weary, as if he had been up most of the night conducting his investigations For Oxford, the arrival of twenty seven American tourists is nothing out of the ordinary until one of their number is found dead in Room 310 at the Randolph Hotel It looks l Read by Michael PenningtonTotal Runtime 7 hours 8 minsBodleian Library, OxfordDescription He looked overweight around the midriff, though nowhere else, and she wondered whether perhaps he drank too much He looked weary, as if he had been up most of the night conducting his investigations For Oxford, the arrival of twenty seven American tourists is nothing out of the ordinary until one of their number is found dead in Room 310 at the Randolph Hotel It looks like a sudden and tragic accident Only Chief Inspector Morse appears not to overlook the simultaneous theft of a jewel encrusted antique from the victim s handbag Then, two days later, a naked and battered corpse is dragged from the River Cherwell A coincidence Maybe But this time Morse is determined to prove the link Mr Projectionist is trying hard to entice me into a TV series and I am adamant that that is not on the cards Adam Ant, I tell ya The Wolvercote Tongue bears a remarkable resemblence to Alfred s Jewel, currently in the Ashmolean, Oxford.Hmm, this insert into the oeuvre seems slightly distorted forced even Baseline 3 4 Last Bus to Woodstock Inspector Morse, 1 3 Last Seen Wearing Inspector Morse, 2 3 The Silent World of Nicholas Quinn Inspector Morse, 3 3 Service of All the Dead Inspector Morse, 4 3 The Dead of Jericho Inspector Morse, 5 4 The Riddle of the Third Mile Inspector Morse, 6 3 The Secret of Annexe 3 Inspector Morse 7 3 The Wench Is Dead Inspector Morse, 8 3 The Jewel That Was Ours Inspector Morse, 9 3 Morse s Greatest Mystery and Other Stories


  4. Baba Baba says:

    Inspector Morse mystery No 9 and the finest so far, in my humble opinion This is an Agatha Christie esque murder mystery paced to perfection A package tour of mostly elderly Americans is disrupted by thievery and possible murders plural and Morse 8 out of 12


  5. Ms.pegasus Ms.pegasus says:

    Clues, hypotheses, even establishing just which crime has been committed overwhelm the hapless reader in this Inspector Morse mystery The structure is reminiscent of an Agatha Christie whodunit, but with infinitelycomplications and of course the atmospheric tone of the historic university town of Oxford Dexter s detective is the curmudgeonly Inspector Morse whose pockets are somehow always empty when the bar tab comes around, to be paid by his long suffering assistant, Sgt Lewis Morris Clues, hypotheses, even establishing just which crime has been committed overwhelm the hapless reader in this Inspector Morse mystery The structure is reminiscent of an Agatha Christie whodunit, but with infinitelycomplications and of course the atmospheric tone of the historic university town of Oxford Dexter s detective is the curmudgeonly Inspector Morse whose pockets are somehow always empty when the bar tab comes around, to be paid by his long suffering assistant, Sgt Lewis Morris idiosyncrasies include a far too keen appetite for Glenfiddich single malt scotch, a passionate appreciation of classical music, and an apparently flawless command of the Classics, an oddly reassuring quirk that endears this character to the author s followers.At the heart of this particular mystery is one of the Ashmolean Museum s most revered treasures, the Alfred Jewel It is a masterpiece of Anglo Saxon craftsmanship and bears the inscription AELFRED MEC HEHT GEWYRCAN Alfred ordered me to be made A fictional counterpart, the Wolvercote Tongue, is to be reunited with the Alfred piece in a highly publicized ceremony Laura Stratton, widow of an American collector will make the presentation Laura and her husband Eddie are part of a well heeled exclusive group of Americans shepherded by John Ashenden on the Historic Cities of England tour which will pass through Oxford No sooner than their arrival, however, Laura is found dead in her hotel suite, and the Tongue, which she kept at all times in her purse, is missing Murder That hypothesis is dashed by the medical examiner two of them, in fact Laura died of a massive heart attack Was the heart attack connected to the theft But why would anyone steal the Tongue It is so recognizable it would be impossible to fence Did a theft even occur But surely Dr Theodore Kemp, whose professional future was linked to this important new Ashmolean acquisition would have seen and inspected the item multiple times during the course of his research And really, why is everyone, even those with verifiable alibis, lying to Inspector Morse With a notebook at my side and a re reading of the first two sections of the book, I was still stumped My advice Just sit back and enjoy the tour Dexter provides a convenient map of Oxford s streets and colleges Tracing the numerous excursions of the characters over the two day period of their stay will heighten the sense of being there Cedric Downes, one of the academic docents and a colleague of Dr Kemp s, will point out that Magdalen St is pronounced Maudlin Street, while Magdalen Road is pronounced just as it is written As for the famous English Breakfast, one of the high points of my bed and breakfast stays when I was young ,Few English families living in England have much direct contact with the English Breakfast It is therefore fortunate that such an endangered institution is perpetuated by the kitchen staff in guest houses, B Bs, transport caf s, and other no starred and variously starred hotels This breakfast comprises at its best a milkily opaqued fried egg two rashers of non brittle, rindless bacon a tomato grilled to a point where the core is no longer a hard white nodule to be operated upon by the knife a sturdy sausage, deeply and evenly browned and a slice of fried bread, golden brown, and only just crisp, with sufficient fat not excessively to dismay any meddlesome dieticianp.67 Of course the characters, whittled down to about a dozen significant players, are described with a similar ironic reserve Dexter lavishes particular ire on Kemp A lisp heightens his impression of affectation The man is self preening, lazy and a serial womanizer withregard for his rain soaked shoes than the damage he may have caused to the woman he has just visited.This was a satisfying mystery with a connecting trail of crimes It s the third Inspector Morse book I have read.NOTES Interview with Colin Dexter


  6. Rose Rose says:

    One annoying element of Dexter s writing is his tendency to render the speech of anyone he considers must talk a bit funny basically, anyone working class or foreign in a needlessly phonetic, mocking way Okay, Arksford is mildly entertaining, but do we need to be told that someone says vay cation or pronounces Shirley as Shurley Naturally, if you are English and don t live on a council estate, you never drop or slur any letters but watch out, as soon as you go on the dole, you will One annoying element of Dexter s writing is his tendency to render the speech of anyone he considers must talk a bit funny basically, anyone working class or foreign in a needlessly phonetic, mocking way Okay, Arksford is mildly entertaining, but do we need to be told that someone says vay cation or pronounces Shirley as Shurley Naturally, if you are English and don t live on a council estate, you never drop or slur any letters but watch out, as soon as you go on the dole, you will never again speak an ing word properly.Another annoying element I only really picked up on because I just read another book by him, The Daughters of Cain, is his tendency to re use elements Ones I noticed included the description of a woman s breast, stomach, thighs as over ripe , and the reuse of a couple of the epigrams that head each chapter, including a quote from The Rubaiyat that also appeared in The Daughters of Cain, another quote I am almost certain also appeared there but I can t check, since it s gone back to the library , and the reuse of the the wench is dead quotation from, surprisingly enough, his book The Wench Is Dead I had always been mildly impressed by his inclusion of aor less apposite reference for the chapters, but am less so now I have realised that he recycles them Okay, it s a fairly minor quibble, but it jars a bit.The plot is decent enough although its convolutions get a little tiresome at points and it suffers from the perennial problem of mystery books if there s still a hefty chunk of pages to go, you know that whoever they have just arrested and are sure dunnit is going to be the wrong person, because otherwise there s nothing interesting enough about them being guilty to fill 50 odd pages.And do you think there are far too many references to Morse never paying for drinks.


  7. Leslie Leslie says:

    This entry in the Inspector Morse series was very good, with some misdirection but otherwise a fairly straightforward plot and solution unlike some of the earlier books in the series This mystery was alsofocused on the plot, with considerably less diversions into Morse s interests in the opposite sex or in drink My biggest complaint the solution wasn t possible for the reader to figure out completely although it was possible in broad outline.


  8. David (דוד) David (דוד) says:

    The ninth in the Inspector Morse Mysteries, where he has to solve the mystery of the theft of a historically valued jewel, and two dead bodies Good one,and quite complicated to solve.The Inspector Morse books have kept on becoming better since its first book Although I have given this a three star, it is still a strong one.Very much readable, but certainly not as great as the previous book in the series.


  9. Jill Hutchinson Jill Hutchinson says:

    Another is the Inspector Morse series and equally as complex as others in the ouevre An American tourist dies of an apparent heart attack in a local hotel and Morse is less than pleased to be called out on this seemingly innocent death But this is a Morse mystery, so you know that there is muchgoing on that meets the eye As usual Morse gets off track immediately once he figures out that something is amiss and we try to follow his logic as he moves toward the answer Colin Dexter s book Another is the Inspector Morse series and equally as complex as others in the ouevre An American tourist dies of an apparent heart attack in a local hotel and Morse is less than pleased to be called out on this seemingly innocent death But this is a Morse mystery, so you know that there is muchgoing on that meets the eye As usual Morse gets off track immediately once he figures out that something is amiss and we try to follow his logic as he moves toward the answer Colin Dexter s book are such fun to read and can be rather educational when Morse gets on a roll regarding literature, music, et al I watched the television series before I read the books, so I can see John Thaw as aattractive Morse than Dexter describes him in print One of the great modern British mystery series


  10. Jo Hurst Jo Hurst says:

    Having recently seen the tv adaptation of this story I was not as focused on the story as I could have been However, the book is different from the TV adaptation and is far far better Morse and Lewis try and find a connection between the theft of a rare and precious historical artefact the Wolvercote Tongue and the deaths of Laura Stratton the owner of the Tongue and Dr Kemp, the historian who was to revive it However as usual no one and nothing is what they seem andthan one person in Having recently seen the tv adaptation of this story I was not as focused on the story as I could have been However, the book is different from the TV adaptation and is far far better Morse and Lewis try and find a connection between the theft of a rare and precious historical artefact the Wolvercote Tongue and the deaths of Laura Stratton the owner of the Tongue and Dr Kemp, the historian who was to revive it However as usual no one and nothing is what they seem andthan one person in the American tourist party is lying about their whereabouts and their history A novel with the usual intrigue and a rather moving ending


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The Jewel That Was Ours✅ [PDF / Epub] ☉ The Jewel That Was Ours By Colin Dexter ⚣ – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Superbly clue ladenA complex and satisfying puzzle THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBEThe case seems so simple, Inspector Morse deemed it beneath his notice A wealthy, elderly American tourist has a heart attack Superbly clue ladenA complex That Was Epub µ and satisfying puzzle THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBEThe case seems so simple, Inspector Morse deemed it beneath his notice A wealthy, elderly American tourist has a heart attack in her The Jewel eBook Ë room at Oxford s luxurious Randolph Hotel Missing from the scene is the lady s handbag, which contained the Wolvercote Tongue, a priceless jewel that her late husband had bequeathed to the Ashmolean Museum Jewel That Was MOBI õ just across the street Morse proceeds to spend a great deal of time thinking and drinking in the hotel s bar, certain the solution is close at hand until conflicting stories, suspicious doings, and a real murder convince him otherwise It is a delight to watch this brilliant, quirky man Morse deduce MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.


About the Author: Colin Dexter

Norman Colin Dexter was That Was Epub µ an English crime writer, known for his Inspector Morse novelsHe started writing mysteries in during a family holiday We were in a little guest house halfway between Caernarfon The Jewel eBook Ë and Pwllheli It was a Saturday and it was raining it s not unknown for it to rain in North Wales The children were moaning I was sitting at the kitchen table with nothing Jewel That Was MOBI õ else to do, and I wrote the first few paragraphs of a potential detective novel Last Bus to Woodstock was published in and introduced the world to the character of Inspector Morse, the irascible detective whose penchants for cryptic crosswords, English literature, cask ale and Wagner reflect Dexter s own enthusiasms Dexter s plots are notable for his use of false leads and other red herringsThe success of the episodes of the TV series Inspector Morse, produced between and , brought further acclaim for Dexter In the manner of Alfred Hitchcock, he also makes a cameo appearance in almost all episodes More recently, his character from the Morse series, the stalwart Sgt now Inspector Lewis features in episodes of the new ITV series Lewis As with Morse, Dexter makes a cameo appearance in several episodes Dexter suggested the English poet A E Housman as his great life on the BBC Radio programme of that name in May Dexter and Housman were both classicists who found a popular audience for another genre of writingDexter has been the recipient of several Crime Writers Association awards two Silver Daggers for Service of All the Dead in and The Dead of Jericho in two Gold Daggers for The Wench is Dead in and The Way Through the Woods in and a Cartier Diamond Dagger for lifetime achievement in In Dexter received a Macavity Award for his short story Evans Tries an O Level In , he was elected a member of the by invitation only Detection ClubIn , Dexter was awarded the Officer of the Order of the British Empire for services to literatureFrom WikipediaSeries Inspector MorseAwards Crime Writers Association Silver Dagger Service of all the Dead The Dead of JerichoCrime Writers Association Gold Dagger The Wench is Dead The Way Through the Woods.