Paperback ☆ Bony Legs PDF/EPUB º


Bony Legs ☆ Bony Legs PDF / Epub ✩ Author Joanna Cole – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Bony Legs Dirk Zimmer Livres NotRetrouvez Bony Legs et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion bony legs Traduction en franais exemples anglaisTraductions en contexte de bony le Bony Legs Dirk Zimmer Livres NotRetrouvez Bony Legs et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Bony Legs Traduction en franais exemples anglaisTraductions en contexte de Bony Legs en anglais franais avec Reverso Context With Bony Legs and pigtails and bracesBony Legs Cole, Joanna Livres NotRetrouvez Bony Legs et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasionBony Legs Livres NotRetrouvez Bony legs et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Bony Legs Bony Legs Anthony Road single , releasedSeptember Anthony Road Anthony Road is a song written about a young girl named Janice Pockett, who vanished from the town of Tolland, CT back inJanice was last seen as she left her house on her bike to retrieve a butterfly This song is my artistic interpretation of her story I grew up on Anthony Road, right down the street from where she BGCDC stories Bony Legs YouTube Bony Legs by Joanna Cole Duration Mr B and Friends read Aloudviews How To Speak by Patrick Winston DurationMIT.

    books Unlimited | New & Used bookstore | Franklin, NC – buyprobolan50.co.uk legs et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Bony Legs Bony Legs Anthony Road single , releasedSeptember Anthony Road Anthony Road is a song written about a young girl named Janice Pockett, who vanished from the town of Tolland, CT back inJanice was last seen as she left her house on her bike to retrieve a butterfly This song is my artistic interpretation of her story I grew up on Anthony Road, right down the street from where she BGCDC stories Bony Legs YouTube Bony Legs by Joanna Cole Duration Mr B and Friends read Aloudviews How To Speak by Patrick Winston DurationMIT."/>
  • Paperback
  • 48 pages
  • Bony Legs
  • Joanna Cole
  • English
  • 07 October 2017
  • 9780590405164

About the Author: Joanna Cole

Joanna Cole, who also wrote under the pseudonym B J Barnet, was an author of children’s books who teaches scienceShe is most famous as the author of The Magic School Bus series of children's books Joanna Cole wrote over books ranging from her first book Cockroach to her famous series Magic School BusCole was born in Newark, New Jersey, and grew up in nearby East Orange She loved science.



10 thoughts on “Bony Legs

  1. Calista Calista says:

    This is a folktale about Baba Yaga, the evil witch, called Bony-Legs in this story. I have to say that this is the old way of seeing witches. Witches were vilified by people for a long time, even though they were mostly herbalist. So, I don't really like the Evil witch troupe, but...

    This is a good telling of the stony. A girl is going to look for a needle and thread for her mother when she comes across the house in the forest with chicken feet. She is a kind girl and she helps the gate, the dog, the cat on the way to the house. So when the witch wants to eat her with her iron teeth, the cat, dog and gate help her get away.

    The story is good and scary. There is plenty to send chills down the spines of kiddies here. The artwork is decent, it sets the tone of being edgy and a bit scary. So, it's an evil witch, but I still enjoyed the story, so I'll see Bony-Legs as the exception to the rule on witches.

  2. Rebecca McNutt Rebecca McNutt says:

    I used to love this book every Halloween. It's one of those tried and true stories that never goes out of style, and one among few classics that really give off the eerie atmosphere of what Halloween is all about (even though right now it's April). Bony-Legs is a weird book, but a wonderful one, and it proves that a scary story can be good without needing to be violent, crass or gory. What two things brought it the most to life for me were the excellent illustrations, and the element of friendship and resourcefulness amidst the horror. Dirk Zimmer's drawings give the book an atmosphere that is both whimsical and spooky, using muted colours and simple details to add a unique charm to the story. The main character, Sasha, finds that using the tools she has to outwit the creepy and conniving Bony-Legs witch requires her own craftiness, as well as help from two lovable animals.

    Although not my absolute favourite Halloween book, Bony-Legs is a lot of fun and a story that could be perfect around a summer campfire just as much as any Halloween setting. Its classic mythical style makes it both memorable and powerful at the same time.

  3. Abigail Abigail says:

    Dispatched by her mother to fetch a needle and thread, Sasha finds her way to the home of Bony-Legs, a terrible child-eating witch whose house in the forest rests on chicken feet. Here her actions in oiling the gate and feeding the dog and cat are repaid, as each aid her when she must escape the witch, intent on cooking her. Fleeing through the now silent gate, Sasha uses the mirror and comb given to her by the cat and dog to create obstacles for the witch - the mirror is transformed into a lake, the comb into a massive barrier - and thereby making it safely home...

    Although author Joanna Cole does not include any author's note to that effect, Bony-Legs is a retelling of the classic Russian folktale of Baba Yaga and the Little Girl, which has many variants. The language is simple - this is as much an early reader as a picture-book - but nevertheless expressive, and Cole manages to spin an engrossing story, despite the limited lexicon necessitated by the early reader format. The artwork by Dirk Zimmer, who also illustrated Alvin Schwartz's In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories , is deliciously creepy, and captures the suspense of the story. I was torn in rating this, as I found it quite engaging, but was also genuinely irritated by the fact that Cole didn't include any mention of source material. This robs the child of the knowledge that he or she is reading a story from another culture, and prevents them from seeking other stories about the eponymous figure - the terrifying Baba Yaga. Hopefully adult caregivers will be more knowledgable, and fill in that information. If half stars were available, I'd give this 3.5, because of this issue, but as they are not, I'll be generous and round up to 4. Recommended to early readers looking for deliciously creepy stories about witches.

  4. Mir Mir says:

    Baba Yaga type witch is thwarted of her chance to eat a small girl by the intervention of her cat, dog, and gate, to whom the child has shown kindness.

  5. Ashley Ashley says:

    This was a great book that I had read as a child. I always thought it was such a good book, and now that I'm older and think it was a great teaching tool for young minds.
    This book was a great story plot, a book with good morals, Teaches them to treat others good and with respect you never know when you might need a helping hand, and other great life lessons for children, and let kids know even in the worst places if you try your best you can do anything! And isn't that what we try to teach children anyway?
    So happy I found this to share with everyone especially people with young minds this is the book for you.. (Or if you just want to look through a book that's tastefully done and actually pretty funny!)

  6. SheAintGotNoShoes SheAintGotNoShoes says:

    I am absolutely loving every single Baba Yaga story I can get my hands on. Pity I did not read any of them 50 years ago when I was the target audience. Oh well, better late than never !!!!

  7. Valerie Valerie says:

    This is a great book to read if you want to scare the pants off your four-year-old! Bony-Legs is a creepy old witch who lives in a house that stands on chicken feet (at this point, the bizarrely creepy illustrations were causing my child's breath to come faster). Sasha, our young heroine, is supposed to be borrowing some thread for her mother, but of course she ends up in Bony-Legs' clutches (at this point I asked if I should stop reading the book, and the reply was: Yes! No! Yes! No! We read on).

    Nice and clever Sasha does manage to get away in the end (luckily. At least my little girl has a chance at getting some sleep tonight). A good pre-Halloween read, but not for the faint of heart.

    This book inspired me to check out Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, because that's what scared me when I was little. Review TK.

  8. Meredith Meredith says:

    Bony-Legs is Baba Yaga, the bony-legged. She is a witch who lives in a house on chicken legs deep in forest, flies in a mortar and pestle that she steers with her broom, and features prominently into Slavic folklore and legend. Baba Yaga is usually portrayed as a wicked witch who loves to eat bad children, but she is often sought out by heroes for her wisdom.

    This is the most Americanized/anglicized retelling of “Vasilisa the Beautiful” I have ever read. In fact, when I read it as a child growing up in the Midwest, even though the little girl in the story had the odd name Sasha, there was nothing that made me think that Bony-Legs couldn't be living in woods near my house.

  9. Michael Fitzgerald Michael Fitzgerald says:

    Brilliant easy reader adaptation of a Russian folk classic. Dirk Zimmer's illustrations (watercolors on pen-and-ink) are detailed and distinctive. Despite his use of bright pastel colors, Baba Yaga is suitably scary. This version has been praised for its subtle approach, which makes the tale family friendly without destroying it.

  10. Kara Kara says:


    Very similar to how I imagine Maurice Sendak would have presented Baba Yaga.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *